JCR-UK

the former

Wolverhampton Synagogue

& Jewish Community

Wolverhampton, West Midlands

 

 

   


JCR-UK is a genealogical and historical website covering all Jewish communities and
congregations throughout the British Isles and Gibraltar, both past and present.

City of Wolverhampton

Wolverhampton, with a population of about 240,000, lying to the northeast of Birmingham, became a metropolitan borough in 1974 within the newly created metropolitan county of West Midlands. In 1986, Wolverhampton became a unitary authority, when West Midlands lost its administrative status, becoming purely a ceremonial and geographical county. Until 1974, Wolverhampton was a county borough and part of the county of Staffordshire (and included most of the former borough of Bilston from 1966). Wolverhampton achieved Millennium City Status on 31st January 2001.

The Jewish Community

An Introduction by Martin Rispin

The history of Judaism in Wolverhampton is not particularly well documented and some of the frequently stated ‘facts’ have been found to be, at best, based on tradition rather than documented evidence. The following is, unfortunately, the best (currently) available record:

The first Synagogue in Wolverhampton was a licensed room in a house in the now demolished St. James’ Square, this is recorded in contemporary (1850/51) Trade Directories which also note that the Rabbi was Isaac Barnett (indeed the Synagogue was in his house). There was also a Jews’ Boys’ and Girls’ School, also in St. James’ Square, presumably also in Rabbi Barnett’s house, with the School Master a Reverend Manasseh Cohen.

Trade Directories also record that the community was already saving for a dedicated Synagogue and had amassed £300. This finally materialised in 1858 on the corner of Long Street/Fryer Street but there are no extant plans of this Synagogue although there are newspaper reports of its opening by the Chief Rabbi Dr. Adler. In 1902 it suffered a major fire and in 1903 the entire building was largely reconstructed in the Ashkenazian style by Wolverhampton architect Frederick Beck (these plans still exist). The Synagogue’s heyday was in the 1930s but after the Second World War the congregation gradually dwindled before transferring to Singers Hill Synagogue in Birmingham in 1999 when a quorum (minyan) could no longer be obtained. The old Synagogue is now a Church but is still recognisable as the former Synagogue. (See below for Wolverhampton Jewish Cemetery Information by Martin Rispin.)

Research by the All Saints and Blakenhall New Deal for Communities Heritage Project (2005-2011) has (re-)stimulated interest in the history of Judaism in Wolverhampton with considerable research being carried out at the old Burial Ground.

In the mid-1960s a Wolverhampton Liberal Jewish Circle was formed in the town, existing until the mid-1970s(ii)

Congregation Data

Name:

Wolverhampton Synagogue

also known as Wolverhampton Hebrew Congregation

Address:

Fryer Street (corner Long Street, previously known as Short Street(iii)), Wolverhampton.(iv)

Plot acquired in 1857,(v) foundation stone laid in 1858,(vi) and synagogue consecrated in 1858 by Chief Rabbi Adler.(vii) The synagogue was severely damaged by fire in 1902 and largely rebuilt.(viii)

Former Address:

The previously synagogue was in St. James Square(xi), Horseley Fields, Wolverhampton, held under a lease taken in 1850(xii) and expiring in 1857(xiii), which also included the residence for the congregation's minister.(xiv)

Formation:

The first Jew known to have settled in Wolverhampton is believed to be a Levi Harris in about 1837.(xv) The first organised congregation reputedly owes its origins the a Mr. Aarons of Berry Street who, in the mid 1840s, on the death of his father, was able to organise a minyan (prayer quorum) of ten local Jewish men at his home in order to recite prayers during the week of sheva. At the end of the week, those ten men met and decided to form an organised congregation, initially meeting in private homes with a Mr Gordon of St George's Parade, Wolverhampton, acting as a lay reader.(xvi) Subsequently (in 1850) premises were rented for a synagogue.

Current Status:

Synagogue closed in 1999(xvii) and was sold and converted into a Church of England (Continuing) place of worship, St Silas Church.

Ritual:

Ashkenazi Orthodox

Affiliation:

The congregation was an unaffiliated congregation under the aegis of the Chief Rabbi.

Ministers:  (To view a short profile of a minister whose name appears in blue - hold the cursor over the name.)

Rev. Isaac Barnett - from before 1850 until about 1851(xxi)

Rev. Menasseh Cohen - from about 1852 until October 1859(xxii)

Rev. Woolf Marcus Spero - in and about 1862(xxiii)

Rev. Elias Phillips - in and about 1874(xxiv)

Rev. Israel Greenberg - from 1876 until February 1883(xxv)

Rev. Isaac Aarons - from 1889 until 1894(xxviii)

Rev. I. Levy - from at least 1896 until about 1903(xxix)

Rev. Joseph Julius Rosin - from 1903 until about 1912(xxx)

Rev. Simon Wykansky - from 1912 until 1920(xxxi)

Rev. Joseph Herman - from 1920 until 1925(xxxii)

Rev. Wilfred Wolfson - from 1925 until 1928(xxxv)

Rev. Michael Isaacs - from 1928 until 1932(xxxvi)

Rev. Louis Wykansky - from 1932 until 1936(xxxvii)

Rev. Reuben Restan - from 1936 until 1937(xl)

Rev. Ephraim Shine - from 1937 until about 1945(xli)

Rev. Isidor Wilner - from 1950 until 1952(xlii)

Rev. Abraham Bernstein - from 1953 until 1967(xliii)

Lay Officers of the Congregation:

Very limited data is available prior to 1896 (the sources being indicated below) and this is somewhat sketchy. From 1896, all data on lay officers has been extracted from listings in Jewish Year Book (first published 1896/7).(xlvii)

Presidents

elected 1850 - David Lazerus Davies(xlviii)

c.1859 - Marcus Gordon(xlix)

c.1862 - Jacob Cohen(l)

at least 1869 to 1873 - Herman Zusman(li)

1873 to at least 1874 - Marcus Gordon(lii)

* * *

1896-1903 - M. Goldenberg

1903-1904 - G. Greenstone

1904-1905 - M. Goldenberg

1905-1908 - G. Greenstone

1908-1909 - M. Goldenberg

1909-1913 - H. Rosenshine

1913-1915 - H. Richmond

1915-1916 - G. Greenstone

1916-1924 - H. Rosenshine

1924-1927 - H. Richmond

1927-1931 - H. Rosenshine

1931-1933 - H. Richmond

1933-1937 - I. Davies

1937-1940 - P. Rosenshine

1940-1945 - no data

1945-1956 - Dr. L. Seaton

from 1956 - no data


Vice Presidents

elected 1850 - Levi Harris(lv)

* * *

1947-1956 - D. Goodman(lvi)

1954-1956 - S. Wernick(lvi)

from 1956 - no data


Wardens

1947-1956 - S. Linds

from 1956 - no data

Treasurers

at least 1873-1874 - Solomon Auerbach(lviii)

elected 1874 - Henry Solomon(lix)

* * *

1896-1902 - M. Schwerin

1902-1903 - G. Greenstone

1903-1904 - M. Goldenberg

1904-1905 - Eli Tumpowsky

1905-1908 - M. Schwerin

1908-1909 - H. Richmond

1909-1911 - M. Cohen

1911-1914 - D. Goodman

1914-1915 - H. Richmond

1915-1920 - no data

1920-1925 - D. Goodman

1925-1933 - A. Post

1933-1940 - P. Rosenshine

1940-1945 - no data

1945-1946 - J. MogilM.J. Middleweek

1946-1947 - J. Mogil

1947-1956 - J. Alpren

from 1956 - no data


Secretaries & Hon Secretaries

c.1874 - Zadoc Rudelsheim(lx)

* * *

1896-1904 - S. Benjamin

1904-1909 - D. Goodman

1909-1911 - P. Klass

1911-1913 - M.J. Greenstone

1913-1916 - H. Brown

1916-1919 - D. Goodman

1919-1933 - D.E. Davies

1933-1937 - Mrs. F. Greenstone

1937-1945 - Rev. Ephraim Shine(lxi)
(until at least 1940 with E. Harris

1945-1955 - M.J. Middleweek

1955-1999 - H. Kronheim

Membership Data:

Number of Seatholders (or, from 1938, Members)(lxiv) - for earlier data, see Board of Deputies Returns

1896

1904

1912

1938

1946

1948

43

48

40

47

85

75

Reports & Survey(lxv)

1977 - 26 male (or household) members and 6 female members

1983 - 28 male (or household) members and 12 female members

1990 - 34 members (comprising 24 households, 3 individual male and 7 individual female members)

1996 - 23 members (comprising 15 households, 3 individual male and 5 individual female members)

Registration District:

Wolverhampton, since 1 July 1837 - Register Office website

 


Search the All-UK Database

The records in the database associated with Wolverhampton include:

  • Burials

    • Blakenhall Cemetery 1851 - 1993 (122 records);

    • Merridale Cemetery 1965 - 2005 (61 records).

  • 1851 Anglo Jewry Database, including Bilston (3 miles to the southeast) (updated 2016)

    • Individuals in the 1851 Anglo Jewry Database who were living in:
      Wolverhampton during the 1810s (1 record), 1830s (5 records), 1840s (26 records), 1850s (85 records), 1860s (19 records), 1870s (16 records), 1880s (12 records), 1890s (2 records), 1900s (1 record); and
      Bilston during the 1830s (1 record), 1840s (3 records), 1880s (1 record) and 1890s (1 record). 

 

Online Articles, Videos and Other Material
relating to the Wolverhampton Jewish Community

on JCR-UK

 

on Third Party Websites

  • Lost Pioneers: Wolverhampton's Victorian Jewish Community - illustrated presentation (YouTube video) by a local historian Andy Sloane.

  • The Other immigrants of Carribee Island: Wolverhampton’s Jewish community Part 1 and Part 2 by Simon Briercliffe, February 2016 - the story of Jewish immigrants in Wolverhampton town centre in the mid-nineteenth century

  • Former Synagogue - Fryer Street - a video of interior of Wolverhampton synagogue narrated  by Dr Deirdre Burke, filmed after its closure in 1999 but before its conversion into a church.

 

Notable Jewish Connections with Wolverhampton

(courtesy Steven Jaffe)

  • Helene Hayman, Baroness Hayman, was born in Wolverhampton in 1949, the daughter of Maurice Middleweek, who served as secretary of the Wolverhampton Hebrew Congregation. She was Labour MP for Welwyn and Hatfield from 1974 to 1979, and became a life peer in 1996 holding a number of Government positions, including as Minister of State for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (1999-2001). She was Lord Speaker of the House of Lords (2006-2011).

  • Renee Short (1919-2003) was Labour MP for Wolverhampton NE, 1964-1983.

 

Other Wolverhampton Jewish Institutions & Organisations

Educational & Theological

  • Hebrew National Schools - founded 1858(lxxi)
    Known Headmasters (other than the congregation's minister) - Zadok Rudelsheim (early 1970s(lxxii)); Henry Philip Levy (mid 1870s(lxxiii)); M. Morris (1890s and early 1900s(lxxiv)); Eli Tumpowsky (early 1900s(lxxv))

  • Hebrew and Religious Classes - from the establishment of the congregation

Other Institutions

  • Hebrew Benevolent Society - founded 1872(lxxviii)

  • Orphan Aid Society - founded in 1915,(lxxix) although a branch existed from 1893 to 1914(lxxx)

  • Hebrew Philanthropic Society and Sabbath Meal Society - founded in 1867,(lxxxi) although a Hebrew Philanthropic Society was already in existence by 1850(lxxxii)

  • Zionist Society - founded by 1926(lxxxiii)

  • Synagogue Ladies' Guild - founded by 1946(lxxxiv)

 

Wolverhampton Jewish Cemetery Information
by Martin Rispi

Plaque to Duke of Sutherland
Plaque to the Duke of Sutherland
at the Burial Ground in Blakenhall

There are two Jewish cemetery in Wolverhampton:

  • Wolverhampton Old Jews Burial Ground, Thompson Avenue, Blakenhall, WV2 (no longer in use)
     
    Associated with both Synagogues was a Jews’ Burial Ground in the Blakenhall area of Wolverhampton. The land for this was provided by the Duke of Sutherland in 1851, this fact is recorded on two dedication plaques and the site is shown on an 1845 map as ‘Slang at Blakemore’ i.e. a long and thin strip of land NB the Slang extended further back than the current Burial Ground. The Burial Ground has high walls and an Ohel; these were added in 1884 and the entire site, with circa 140 headstones and also possibly a number of unmarked burials, is now statutorily grade II listed but not generally open to visitors. The first recorded burial at the site is that of Benjamin Cohen who died on 25 June 1851 in his eighth year (his headstone is partly eroded) and it is said that his death was the reason why the site was originally provided by the Duke. Benjamin Cohen’s Death Certificate records that he was the son of Jacob Cohen, a Pawn Broker of Bilston Street, and that he died of dropsy hydrothorax with his death reported a week later by (Rabbi) Isaac Barnett who was also present at the death.

    The Ohel has both a prayer hall, with four fine marble prayer plaques donated by the Hart family in 1906 and manufactured by local monumental mason’s Hopcraft, as well as Bet Tahara side room with the remnants of a pump and a coal fired water heater. The Ohel currently requires restoration. By the mid twentieth century the Burial Ground was almost full and the Ohel was beginning to deteriorate plus access to the secluded site was never easy for visitors. 

    Photographs of Plaques at the Cemetery

  • Merridale Cemetery, Jewish Section, Jeffcock Road

    In 1965 Dr. Leslie Seaton, a well respected Wolverhampton physician, died and left provision for a new Jewish Section at Merridale Cemetery in Jeffcock Road complete with a modern Ohel. Dr. Seaton was the first burial on this site. T he ‘new’ burial ground contains more than 60 burials, and has spaces for many more, although the 1960s Ohel was demolished in the 1980s as it had developed major structural problems and was never replaced, hence the large open space at the centre of the Jewish Section.

We wish to express our thanks and appreciation to Mr. Rispin and the All Saints & Blakenhall Community Development (New Deal for Communities) Heritage Project for the above Introduction and this Cemetery Information and providing the results of their research in connection with this community.

(For additional information, see also IAJGS Cemeteries Project - Wolverhampton)

 

Wolverhampton Jewish Population Data

Year

Number

Source

1896

35 families

(The Jewish Year Book 1896/7)

1918

25 families

(The Jewish Year Book 1919)

1945

135

(The Jewish Year Book 1945/6)

1950

230

(The Jewish Year Book 1951)

1972

31 families

(The Jewish Year Book 1973)

1979

20 families

(The Jewish Year Book 1980)

1990

85

(The Jewish Year Book 1991)

1996

15 families

(The Jewish Year Book 1997)

1999

11

(The Jewish Year Book 2000)

2002

15

(The Jewish Year Book 2003)

 

Notes & Sources
( returns to text above)

  • (i) Reserved.

  • (ii) Listed in Jewish Year Books from 1967 through 1977.

  • (iii) Lost Pioneer video, see Online Articles section.

  • (iv) This was the address given for the congregation in all Jewish Year Books until the congregation ceased being listed.

  • (v) The Jewish Chronicle report of 7 August 1857.

  • (vi) The Jewish Chronicle report of 4 June 1858.

  • (vii) Wolverhampton Chronicle report of 22 August 1958, quoted in Lost Pioneer video.

  • (viii) The Jewish Chronicle report of 7 August 1857.

  • (ix) and (x) Reserved.

  • (xi) St. James's Square no longer exists. Its current location would be at the back end of the Wolverhampton Bus Station - Lost Pioneer video.

  • (xii) The Jewish Chronicle report of 16 October 1850.

  • (xiii) The Other Immigrants of Carribee Island: Wolverhampton’s Jewish Community Part 1, see Online Articles section.

  • (xiv) The Jewish Chronicle report of 16 October 1850.

  • (xv) The Other Immigrants of Carribee Island: Wolverhampton’s Jewish Community Part 1, see Online Articles section.

  • (xvi) Midland Examiner report of 25 March 1876, quoted in Lost Pioneer video.

  • (xvii) Reported in Jewish Year Book 2000.

  • (xviii) to (xx) Reserved.

  • (xxi) The Jewish Chronicle report of 16 October 1850 places Rev. Barnett in Wolverhampton, as the new congregation's existing minister. By August 1851, the congregation was advertising for a replacement.

  • (xxii) The Jewish Chronicle of 28 October 1859 reported on Rev. Menasseh Cohen resignation as the congregation's minister making reference to the seven years he was its minister.

  • (xxiii) The Jewish Chronicle report of 21 November 1862.

  • (xxiv) The Jewish Chronicle report of 2 October 1874 and listed as reader and shochet in The Jewish Directory of 1874. Could possibly be Rev. Eleazar Phillips, minister at the Garnethill synagogue, Glasgow from 1879 for 50 years, but he would have been in his teens when he conducted the High holy day services at Wolverhampton in 1874.

  • (xxv) The Jewish Chronicle of 10 November 1876 reported that Rev J Greenberg of Portsea was elected unanimously as minister of the congregation and on 2 March 1883 that Rev. Israel Greenberg had resigned the office of minister of the congregation.

  • (xxvi) and (xxvii) Reserved.

  • (xxviii) The Jewish Chronicle of 8 November 1889 reported that on Sabbath last Isaac Aarons, of London, conducted the services at Wolverhampton and delivered a sermon and that at a general meeting held on Sunday he was elected minister and teacher to the congregation. Subsequent The Jewish Chronicle reports indicate he remained at Wolverhampton until 1894.

  • (xxix) Based upon Rev. Levy's listing as minister of the congregation in the first Jewish Year book (1896/7) until the 1902/3 edition.

  • (xxx) The Jewish Chronicle reports of 4 December 1903 and May 1912 place Rev Rosin in Wolverhampton and his successor was appointed in 1912. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books 1903/4 through 1912.

  • (xxxi) The father of Rev. Louis Wykansky and father-in-law of Rev. Michael Isaacs, both of whom subsequently served the congregation. Rev. Wykansky's obituary in The Jewish Chronicle 1 December 1939. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books 1913 through 1920.

  • (xxxii) The Jewish Chronicle of 26 March 1920 reported that, at a meeting of the congregation, the Rev. J. Herman of Chester was elected minister and on 27 February 1925 it reported that Rev. Joseph Herman, of Wolverhampton, was appointed chazan and shochet of the Margate congregation. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books 1921 through 1925.

  • (xxxiii) and (xxxiv) Reserved.

  • (xxxv) A Jewish Chronicle wedding notice of 25 September 1925 places Rev. Wolfson in Wolverhampton, being the year of the departure of his predecessor. On 13 April 1928 it reported that Rev. W. Wolfson, of Wolverhampton, has been elected minister and teacher to the Plymouth congregation. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books 1926 through 1928.

  • (xxxvi) The son-in-law of the Rev. Simon Wykansky who previously served the congregation. The Jewish Chronicle of 11 May 1928 reported that at a special meeting of the congregation Rev. M. Isaacs, of Bridgend, South Wales, youngest son of Rev. S. Isaacs, Hanley, was elected chazan, shochet, and teacher to the congregation and on 28 September 1932 it reported that a unanimous "call" had been extended to the Rev. Michael Isaacs (of Wolverhampton) to become minister and shochet to the South Shields Hebrew Congregation and teacher to itse Religion classes. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books 1929 through 1933.

  • (xxxvii) The son of the Rev. Simon Wykansky and brother-in-law of Rev. Michael Isaacs, both of whom previously served the congregation. The Jewish Chronicle 18 November 1932 reported that Rev. L. Wykansky was unanimously elected minister, shochet and teacher of the congregation and on 24 April 1936 it reported that Rev. L. Wykansky, of Wolverhampton, had been elected to the vacant post of second reader, teacher and shochet to the Leazes Park Road Synagogue, Newcastle upon Tyne. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books 1934 through 1936.

  • (xxxviii) and (xxxix) Reserved.

  • (xl) Rev Restan's predecessor served until 1936 and he was elected minister of Derby in 1937. He is listed as minister of the congregation in the Jewish Year Books 1937 only.

  • (xli) Various Jewish Chronicle reports place Rev. Shine in Wolverhampton during this period. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books both prior to the cessation in publication during the war years (the editions from 1938 through 1940) and following the war (the 1945/6 edition).

  • (xlii) The Jewish Chronicle of 11 April 1952, which reported Rev. Wilner's appointment at Ruislip, stated that he had for the last two years been minister to the Wolverhampton community. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books 1951 and 1952.

  • (xliii) The Jewish Chronicle of 11 April 1952, which reported Rev. Wilner's appointment at Ruislip, it stated that he had for the last two years been minister to the Wolverhampton community. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books 1951 and 1952.

  • (xliii) The Jewish Chronicle of 15 May 1953 reported that Rev. Abraham Bernstein had been inducted as minister of the congregation on Sunday and on 8 September 1967 it reported that he had begun his duties on Friday as the new minister of the South East London District Synagogue. He is listed as minister of the congregation in Jewish Year Books 1954 through 1968.

  • (xliv) to (xlvi) Reserved.

  • (xlvii) Where a person is first listed in a year book as holding a particular office, it has been assumed that his term of office commenced in the year of publication of the relevant year book and that he continued in office until the commencement of office of his successor, unless the office was vacant. Initially year books corresponded to the Hebrew year, and thus ran roughly from autumn of one year - the year of publication - until autumn of the next year. From 1909, year books were published according to the Gregorian year, being published generally towards the end of the year prior to the year appearing in the title of the year book. For example, if an officer is listed in Jewish Year Books 1919 through 1924, it is assumed that he commenced office in 1918 and continued in office until 1924. However, it should be noted that this is only an assumption and, accordingly, his actual years of office may differ somewhat from those shown here. Jewish Year Books were not published during World War II subsequent to 1940. There were no Jewish Year Book listings of officers (other than secretary) subsequent to 1956

  • (xlviii) The Jewish Chronicle report of 16 October 1850.

  • (xlix) Mr. Gordon is mentioned as president in The Jewish Chronicle advertisement of 6 May 1859.

  • (l) Mr. Cohen is mentioned as president in The Jewish Chronicle advertisement of 9 May 1862.

  • (li) Mr. Zusman is mentioned as president in The Jewish Chronicle advertisement of 11 June 1869 as well as in some subsequent reports and his re-election as president is reported in The Jewish Chronicle of 9 May 1873. In the Jewish Directory of 1874, he is listed as "warden" and there is no president listed.

  • (lii) Mr. Gordon is mentioned as president in The Jewish Chronicle advertisement of 22 August 1873 and his re-election as president is reported in The Jewish Chronicle of 17 April 1874.

  • (liii) and (liv) Reserved.

  • (lv) The Jewish Chronicle report of 16 October 1850.

  • (lvi) From c.1954 to c.1956 D Goodman and S. Wernick were joint vice presidents.

  • (lvii) Reserved.

  • (lviii) Mr. Auerbach's election as treasurer is reported in 9 May 1873 and he is listed as treasurer in the Jewish Directory of 1874.

  • (lix) Mr. Solomon's election as treasurer is reported in The Jewish Chronicle of 17 April 1874.

  • (lx) Listed as hon. secretary of the congregation and its registrar of marriages of the Jewish Directory of 1874.

  • (lxi) The Jewish Year Book was not published during the war years 1940 to 1945. However as Rev. Shine was listed as secretary both prior to the cessation of publication (in 1938 through 1940) and after the resumption of publication (in 1945/6), it is assumed that he also served in such capacity during throughout the war.

  • (lxii) and (lxiii) Reserved.

  • (lxiv) Data extracted from relevant Jewish Year Book.

  • (lxv) Reports on synagogue membership in the United Kingdom, published by the Board of Deputies of British Jews and which can be viewed on the website of the Institute of Jewish Policy Research. Click HERE for links to the various reports.

  • (lxvi) to (lxx) Reserved.

  • (lxxi) This is the date given in Jewish Year Books from 1896/7. The Jewish Directory of 1874 states that the Jewish School (situated in Snow Hill, master was Benjamin Woolf) was founded on 1 May 1872. However, there are a number of press reports prior to this date clearly referring to the existence of the congregation's School and indeed a school would almost certainly have been established prior to 1858.

  • (lxxii) The Jewish Chronicle reports of 15 December 1871, 19 April 1872 and 9 May 1873

  • (lxxiii) The Jewish Chronicle reports of 15 October 1875 and 28 January 1876

  • (lxxiv) Listed in Jewish Year Books 1896/7 through 1902/2.

  • (lxxv) Listed in Jewish Year Book 1903/4.

  • (lxxvi) and (lxxvii) Reserved.

  • (lxxviii) The Jewish Chronicle report of 4 October 1872.

  • (lxxix) Note in Jewish Year Books from 1927.

  • (lxxx) Note in Jewish Year Books 1913 and 1914. Listed until 1914.

  • (lxxxi) Note in Jewish Year Books from 1896/7.

  • (lxxxii) The Jewish Chronicle report of 18 December 1850.

  • (lxxxiii) First listed in Jewish Year Book 1927.

  • (lxxxiv) First listed in Jewish Year Book 1947.

Jewish Congregations in West Midlands

Jewish Communities of England homepage


Page created: 7 November 2005
Data significantly expanded and notes added: 19 June 2022
Page most recently amended: 24 June 2022

Except where otherwise stated, research by David Shulman, asssted by Steven Jaffe
Formatting by David Shulman


Explanation of Terms   |   About JCR-UK  |   JCR-UK home page

Contact JCR-UK Webmaster:
jcr-ukwebmaster@jgsgb.org.uk

JGSGB  JewishGen


Terms and Conditions, Licenses and Restrictions for the use of this website:

This website is owned by JewishGen and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain. All material found herein is owned by or licensed to us. You may view, download, and print material from this site only for your own personal use. You may not post material from this site on another website without our consent. You may not transmit or distribute material from this website to others. You may not use this website or information found at this site for any commercial purpose.


Copyright © 2002 - 2022 JCR-UK. All Rights Reserved