“Gebe” - Encyclopedia of Jewish
Communities in Hungary
(Nyírkáta, Hungary)

47°52' 22°16'

Translation of the “Gebe” chapter from
Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary

Edited by: Theodore Lavi

Published by Yad Vashem

Published in Jerusalem, 1975


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Acknowledgments

Our sincere appreciation to Yad Vashem
for permission to put this material on the JewishGen web site.

This is a translation from: Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary: Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Hungary,
Edited by Theodore Lavi, published by Yad Vashem, Jerusalem. Page 228.


This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
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JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wish to refer to the original material for verification.
JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy of statements or alter facts cited.


[Page 228]

Gebe

Translated by Jerrold Landau

Donated by Aaron Slotnik

It is a village in the Szatmár District, Mátészalka Region, 1.5 kilometers from Nyirbátor. In 1941, its population was 2,473.

 

Jewish Population

Year Population
1840 160
1880 250
1900 236
1930 137

 

Until the Second World War

The first Jews settled in Gebe during the first half of the 19th century, with the permission of the landowner who encouraged them to open shops there to provide for the needs of the farmers. The farmers were primarily Slovaks who settled there about 50 years previously, and assimilated with the Hungarian residents. The estate was sold at the beginning of the 20th century, but the new owners also treated the Jews favorably.

Most of the Jews of Gebe were merchants who were occupied with the marketing of the agricultural produce of the local farmers, primarily rice and tobacco, which gained fame throughout Hungary. Some were leasers of estates.

The relationship of the residents to the local Jews was generally proper, aside from a brief period following the First World War, when anti–Semitic activity increased in the area, and found expression in the church as well.

The community, which defined itself as Orthodox in 1868, was dependent on Mátészalka. The synagogue was built around 1840. There was also a Chevra Kadisha [burial society] and a cheder.

 

The Holocaust

The suffering of the Jews of Gebe began when the discrimination laws were issued in 1938. These laws included the draft of Jews to forced labor and the restriction of livelihood. With the arrival of the German army in Gebe in March, 1944, the S.S. command demanded that the Jews be deported from the village, which was situated on the Hungarian–Romanian border at the time.

During the second half of April, the Jews of Gebe were transported on wagons to the Mátészalka Ghetto. They wandered about the fields under the open skies for several nights until a place was found for them with difficulty. They were transported to Auschwitz at the beginning of June.

Communal life was not renewed after the war. The few who returned left the place after encountering the hatred of the population. Today, there are no Jews in Gebe.

 

Bibliography:
Yad Vashem Archives 03/1403
Borovszky: Szatmár vármegye, p. 74. In Magyaroszág vm–i
Lévai, J. Zsidósoros Magyaroszágon, p. 410.

 


This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
This material may not be copied, sold or bartered without JewishGen, Inc.'s permission. Rights may be reserved by the copyright holder.


JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wish to refer to the original material for verification.
JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy of statements or alter facts cited.

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