“Ófehértó” - Encyclopedia of Jewish
Communities in Hungary
(Hungary)

47°56' 22°03'

Translation of the “Ófehértó” chapter from
Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary

Edited by: Theodore Lavi

Published by Yad Vashem

Published in Jerusalem, 1975


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Acknowledgments

Our sincere appreciation to Yad Vashem
for permission to put this material on the JewishGen web site.

This is a translation from: Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary: Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Hungary,
Edited by Theodore Lavi, published by Yad Vashem, Jerusalem. Pages 144-145.


This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
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JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wish to refer to the original material for verification.
JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy of statements or alter facts cited.


[Pages 144-145]

Ófehértó

Translated by Jerrold Landau

It is a town in the district of Szabolcs, region of Nyirbakta. Its population in 1941 was 2.927.

 

Jewish Population

Year Population
1784/85 15
1800 82
1940 120

 

Until the Second World War

The first Jews settled in Ófehértó in the second half of the 18th century, on the estate of Count Csáki

[Page 145]

and Count Pálfi. Their main sources of livelihood were commerce and agriculture. Their relations with the residents were generally proper.

Until 1885, the community of Ófehértó was dependent on Nagykálló. From that year, it was dependent on Nyirbátor. With the division of the communities, it defined itself as orthodox. It had a Chevra Kadisha [burial society], a Talmud Torah, and a cheder. Its synagogue was built at the beginning of the 20th century.

Emanuel Sichermann was born in Ófehértó in 1811. He was known for his inventions for the improvement of agriculture, and he worked for the increase of modern agricultural machinery, also among the Jews.

With the proclamation of the separation laws in 1938, several Jews were displaced from their livelihoods.

 

The Holocaust

Fifteen Jews were drafted to forced labor in 1941.

After the entry of the Germans immediately after Passover 1944, the Jews of Ófehértó were transferred to the Kisvárda Ghetto, where approximately 7,000 Jews from the entire area were concentrated under conditions of great crowding, hunger, and torture. Before Shavuot, they were loaded on wagons and deported to Auschwitz. Approximately 80 Jews of Ófehértó were murdered in Auschwitz and labor camps.

After the war, approximately 10 Jews returned to Ófehértó, some from Auschwitz and others from forced labor camps, but they quickly left.

Y. K.

 

Bibliography:
Yad Vashem Archives E-7-4/307

 


This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
This material may not be copied, sold or bartered without JewishGen, Inc.'s permission. Rights may be reserved by the copyright holder.


JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wish to refer to the original material for verification.
JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy of statements or alter facts cited.

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