“Nyirmeggyes” - Encyclopedia of Jewish
Communities in Hungary
(Nyírmeggyes, Hungary)

47°55' 22°16'

Translation of the “Nyirmeggyes” chapter from
Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary

Edited by: Theodore Lavi

Published by Yad Vashem

Published in Jerusalem, 1975


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Acknowledgments

Our sincere appreciation to Yad Vashem
for permission to put this material on the JewishGen web site.

This is a translation from: Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary: Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Hungary,
Edited by Theodore Lavi, published by Yad Vashem, Jerusalem. Page 389.


This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
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[Page 389]

Nyirmeggyes

Translated by Jerrold Landau

Donated by Aaron Slotnik

Nyirmeggyes is a village in the District of Szatmár, Region of Mátészalka. In 1941, its population was 2,402.

 

Jewish Population

Year Population
1784/85 32
1880 227
1900 210
1930 139

 

Until the Second World War

The first Jews of Nyirmeggyes arrived in the second half of the 18th century, with the support of the estate owners. Since the residents of Nyirmeggyes were mainly of Romanian extraction, the estate owners looked upon the Jews as tending toward Hungarian culture, and therefore deserving of their support and protection.

The community defined itself as Orthodox, and was dependent on Mátészalka from 1885.

There was a synagogue there. We do not know the year that it was built. There was also a Chevra Kadisha, a cheder, and a mikva. Rabbi Shmuel David HaLevi Jungreisz served in Nyirmeggyes from 1925.

 

The Holocaust

Just after Passover, 1944, the Jews of Nyirmeggyes were transported to the Mátészalka Ghetto, from where they were transported to Auschwitz.

The community of Nyirmeggyes was not reconstituted after war.

 

Bibliography:
Borovszky: Szatmár vármegye, p. 128. In: Magyarország vm–i.

 


This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
This material may not be copied, sold or bartered without JewishGen, Inc.'s permission. Rights may be reserved by the copyright holder.


JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wish to refer to the original material for verification.
JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy of statements or alter facts cited.

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