“Rajka” - Encyclopedia of Jewish
Communities in Hungary
(Rajka, Hungary)

48°00' 17°12'

Translation of the “Rajka” chapter from
Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary

Edited by: Theodore Lavi

Published by Yad Vashem

Published in Jerusalem, 1975


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Acknowledgments

Our sincere appreciation to Yad Vashem
for permission to put this material on the JewishGen web site.

This is a translation from: Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary: Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Hungary,
Edited by Theodore Lavi, published by Yad Vashem, Jerusalem. Page 507.


This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
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JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wish to refer to the original material for verification.
JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy of statements or alter facts cited.


[Page 507]

Rajka

Translated by Ariela Zucker

Rajka, in German Ragendorf, is a village in the county of Gyor-Moson
in the region of Magyarovar, 29 km from Gyor, the population (1941) 3,064.

 

Jewish Population

Year Number
1725 13
families
1736 103
1840 253
1890 252
1930 136

 

Until World War II

The first Jews arrived to Rajka in 1706 and they are mentioned in the census of 1725.

In 1869 the congregation defined itself as orthodox. On 1885 the settlements of Bezenyre (4 people), Hegyeshalom (5), Horvatjarfahu (10), Dunakiliti (3) and Oroszvair were part of the congregation. On 1921 following the signing of the peace treaty in Trianon those villages remained in Hungry but their rabbinical center was Rajka. 6 other villages that were also part of the town were appropriated by Austria.

The synagogue was built in the second half of the 18th century.

In April 1938 a boat anchored close to town, on it were 50 Jewish families that were deported to the Hungarian border from Burgenland, in Austria, and only after lengthy negotiations the passengers were permitted to go to Israel via Romania.

 

The Holocaust

In May of 1944 the Jews of Rajka were moved to the Ghetto at Moson-Magyarovar and from there they were transported to Auschwitz in June. Their belonging and personal possessions were divided among the workers in the camps.

After the war few of the survivors returned and renewed the congregation. The synagogue was rehabilitated with the help of the 'Joint' but in lieu of the local population's animosity most of Jews left to Israel.

 

Bibliography
Mon. Hun. Jud., VII, pp. 87, 142, 310, 326, 342, 703-704
Zsido Lexikon. pp. 666-667. [Oroszvar].
Karsai, E.: Fegyvertelen…, II. pp. 531-532
Orszagos Egyetertes 14 (1938. IV.29.) no. 18. P. 11; 14 (1938. VIII. 26.) no. 33-34. P. 11; 14 (1938.IX.26.) no. 37-38. Pp. 17/18

This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
This material may not be copied, sold or bartered without JewishGen, Inc.'s permission. Rights may be reserved by the copyright holder.


JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wish to refer to the original material for verification.
JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy of statements or alter facts cited.

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