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[Page 26]

The Extended Family

The Jewish immigrants to the United States formed landsmanshaftn or lodges made up of persons coming from the same town or district. These organizations served many purposes; as mutual aid or benevolent societies they enabled the immigrants to adapt to the new way of life and offered security, friendship, sickness and death benefits and financial aid. By 1914, New York had over five hundred landsmanshaftn and the number continued to grow until the 1930s when the first generation of immigrants began to move away or to die off.

The Chevra Bnei Rabbi Menachem Mendel Anshei Dubrowa was formed on March 25, 1892) the first President being Harry Bloom. The Society was named after the community's tzaddik and the membership grew throughout the early years of the century. The original immigrants had worked twelve hours a day or more, seven days a week, and lived in walk-ups on the lower East Side. A synagogue was purchased on Georgia Avenue in Brooklyn in 1920. The vitality of the organization declined after World War II. In 1955 there were about 200 family members, but by the 1980s membership had fallen to about 85, mostly widows. Because of a deteriorating neighborhood the synagogue was sold in 1968. Society members and their families are buried in three cemeteries, Mount Judah and Washington in Brooklyn and Beth David in EImont, Queens.

 

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Community cemetery plot for Chevra Bnei Menachem Mendel
Anshei Dubrowa in Elmont, Queens, New York.

 

[Page 27]

 

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Dance and meeting notices of the
Chevra Bnei Rabbi Menachem Anshel Dubrowa.

 

[Pages 28-29]

 

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Testimonial banquet to Mr. Harry Rosen at the 45th Anniversary
of Chevra Bnei Menachem Mendel Anshei Dubrowa, March 1934.

 

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