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Who and Where
Biographies (cont.)

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[Page LXIII]

   

Kalman Samsonowicz

Son of Yehezkeil and Sara Ita. Born in Dzialoszyn (Poland) on the 12th of April 1887. Came to America on the 15th of August 1913. He is a member of the First Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim in New York.


Ray Sobel
(Photo)

Daughter of Aizik and Chana. Married William Sobel, who was one of the founders and active workers of the Czenstochower Young Men's Society in New York.

Ray Sobel was one of the founders of the Ladies Auxiliary and of late held the office of treasurer of the organization. She died at the age of 65 on the 2nd of August 1943.


William Sobel
(Photo)

Born in Szeps (Poland). Was an active comrade and an executive member of the Czentochower Young Men. Also, a member and one of the founders of the Czenstochower Relief Committee. He died at the age of 67.


Peretz Salomon (Waszilewicz)

Son of Leibl and Laja. Born in Derby, Conn., on the 6th of February 1913. He died in Chicago on the 4th of July 1922. He was his parents' only son.

Ruda Staszewski
(photo)

Daughter of Ruwen and Miriam Kokocinski. Born in Brzeznica (Poland).


Isidor (Yisroel Jona) Sigman

Son of Israel and Hinda. Born in Kunov (Poland in 1868. Came to America in May 1915. He was a member of the B'nai Brith. He was the founder and president of the action society of the Gnosziner Factory in Czentochow.


Abe (Abraham) Sigman

Son of Isidor (Israel) and Regina. Born in Czenstochow. He came to America twice; the first time in 1915 and the second time in 1938. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge, of the managing committee of the Jewish gymnazie in Czenstochow, of the managing committee of the Czenstochowa manufacturers union, of the managing committee of the sports' union, Makabi in Czenstochow and of the managing committee of the Gnosziner action society in Czentochow.

He died on the 19th of July 1940 in Buffalo, N.Y.


Stanley (Stanislaw) Sigman
(photo)

Son of Isidor and Regina (née Herc). Born on the 3rd of August 1898 in Piotrkow. Came to America for the first time in 1915, returned and again came in 1940. Belonged to various organizations such as: Mason Lodge, American Legion, member of the Czenstochower Industrial Union and of several charitable and cultural organizations. He now lives at 249 St. James Place, Chicago 14, Illinois.

Stanley Sigman is, both at home in Czenstochow and in America, a community worker; he helped greatly with the book, Czenstochower Yidn, with the various material and photographs that he provided.

[Page LXIV]

Edmund Sigman
(photo)

Born in Czenstochow January 1888. At age 10 he began to attend Lamparski's school, studying while simultaneously learning to play the violin with Balsam.

In 1905 he began to study in the Leipzer Conservatory and the same year, he and Wanda Nojfeld gave a chamber music concert in Czenstochow, in which the noted khazan [cantor] Birenboim also took part. The receipts from this concert were donated to a workers' bakery.

After a year of study in Petersburg, Sigman moved to Warsaw where he played with the Philharmonic as a violinist for two years under the direction of Fitelberg and Birnboim; at the same time, he perfected his music in Borcewicz's Conservatory and privately with the famous violinist, Isidor Loto.

In 1911/12 he became a violin teacher in the music school in Poltava.

After the outbreak of the First World War, he gave several concerts with Wanda Nojfeld Kopecka in Czenstochow. The proceeds were given for various charitable purposes.

In 1915, he came to America with his father and brother. First, he settled in Chicago. He was a teacher and, simultaneously, he organized a cooperative symphonic orchestra with which he gave a series of concerts.

In 1926, he moved to Philadelphia, gave lessons in the Settlement Music School, often appeared as a soloist on the radio and, also, organized a chamber orchestra with which he appeared in the Labor Institute.

In 1930, he traveled to Paris, appeared as a guest director of the Warsaw Philharmonic on the radio and with the Lodz Philharmonic.

In 1934, he directed a Chopin concert in Carlsbad. Later, he appeared in a series of concerts in Leningrad, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.

In 1938, he returned to America. He settled in New York where he appeared as a guest director of the Federal Symphonic Orchestra.

Recently, he has given private lessons, created compositions that are often played on the radio.

(Photo, caption: Edmund Sigman conducts the Philharmonic Orchestra in Tel Aviv)


Tamara Sigman
Chicago

(photo)

Daughter of Robert and Jadwiga (Yeta) Svitgal. Born on the 3rd of October 1906 in Lodz. Came to America in 1937. A member of all of the Jewish charitable and communal organizations in Czenstochow and of American ORT.


Yosef Staszewski
(photo)

Son of Moshe and Leah. Born in Piotrkow. Died at the age of 60 in Dzialoszyn in 1932.


Hershl Silver
(photo)

(Known by the name – Hershl Namerower), father of Yeshayahu Leizer Silver and grandfather of Yakov Ber Silver. Died at the age of 88.


Ruchl Silver
(photo)

Mother of Yeshayahu Leizer and grandmother of Yakov Silver. Died at the age of 90.

[Page LXV]

Yeshayahu Leizer Silver
(photo)

Son of Hershl and Ruchl. Born in Dvinsk, December 1859. He came to Czenstochow as a child, at the age of five. He married Chana Birman of Noworadomsk in 1880.

He came to America for the first time in 1889; he was here for a year and a half. The second time in 1906, he remained until the present.

He is a member of the Bnei Yisroel Society, of the Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim and of Czenstochower Relief; one of the founders and first trustee of the Czenstochower Aid Union.

His five grandsons served in the American army.


Chana Silver
(photo)

Wife of Yeshayahu Leizer and mother of Yakov Ber, Cyrl, Reila, Sara Sprintza, Leibish and Toba.

She died in New York.

Yakov Ber Silver
(photo)

Born in 1882. His father, Yeshayahu Leizer was a hat maker. His mother, Chana (née Birman), comes from a village near Radomsk. Yakov Ber is the oldest son of his family of eight children – two sons and six girls. The incident of his lame foot greatly influenced his entire life. It was on a Tisha b'Av when the old Jews go to the visit the graves of their parents and the children make a ruin of the cemetery. Because of this, the cemetery man locked the gate. However, Yakov Ber, the small mazek [mischievous child], wanted to show his friends how to jump over the fence. That is how he banged his knee; he lay in the hospital and could not go to kheder nor to school. His father taught him a little Hebrew at home. He received the nickname, Lamer [lame] Staluk because there was a gentile in Czentochow who was called the Lamer Stelmak.

From childhood on, until 1901, he worked in the small factories in Czenstochow where the “earnings” then were 20 kopikes a week. They lived in Bajer's house, which was called “Bajer's Hotel” on Nadjeczna. At that time, he had organized a troupe of Purim-shpeilers that was the first baby step of a Jewish theater in Czenstochow.

He left for London, became a presser and returned to Czenstochow in 1904. Here he opened a “teahouse” in Yankl Klajnhandler's house (entered through a small alley), that became the quarters of the Bundist organization. He became the scapegoat for everything that happened then. If the S.S. [Zionist Socialists] set fire to Aizik Szliz's house – Yakov Ber was blamed; if a bomb was thrown somewhere – the police looked for Yakov Ber. However, between one arrest and the second – Yakov Ber did his part – organized, agitated and turned the world upside down.

As it happened, the Bund was too reserved for Yakov Ber's temperament. Learning of the activity of the anarchist group under the leadership of Yankl the kamashn-makher [gaiter maker], he made a short visit to Warsaw to see him. However, Yankl the kamashn-makher had already been arrested after an attempted bombing. Yakov Ber was watched by spies, who followed him to Czenstochow. He was immediately arrested on the charge of anarchistic activity in connection with the bombing attempt. He served a year in jail, from which he escaped to Berlin. After a time, he returned, joined a traveling acting troupe, then a professional troupe and acted in the Czenstochower area.

During a performance of Uriel Acosta in Radomsk, the theater manager began to marvel that so many unknown and “uninvited” guests were in the theater. Yakov Ber, who played the main role wanted to run away after the first act. However, all exits were occupied by spies and gendarmes. He was arrested in the middle of acting and his role was taken over by Dovid Zitman. The performance was not interrupted. Yakov Ber was accompanied by a large parade of Noworadomsker Jews. He was in prison for six months and was convicted only of distributing anarchistic literature [and sentenced] to one year in jail – the time he had already served up to the trial. Later, he again acted in the theater, until he left for London in 1909 and after three months for New York.

Here he joined the Czenstochower Arbeter Ring branch 261. Working the entire time in a shop, he took part in various amateur and professional theater troupes, until he took over the leadership of Czenstochower Relief

[Page LXVI]

in New York. He remained chairman of Relief for several years.

He has been a member of Czenstochower branch 11 of the Jewish People's Order (International Workers' Order) since 1930. He was one of the founders and most active workers of Czenstochower Patronet; chairman and executive of United Czenstochower Relief and chairman of the committee and its representative on the editorial board of the book, Czenstochower Yidn.


Katy Slawina
Detroit

Daughter of Yudl and Gitl. Born in Slomnik (Poland) on the 25th of May 1887. Came to America in 1912. She is a member of the Western Ladies Aid Society in Detroit.


Eida Slowik

Born 1884, died on the 13th of September 1933.

(photo)

Morris Slowik

Born 1882, died on the 5th of August 1945.

In memory

The children:

Tila Rubin
Dora Lopaty
Max Slowik
Abo Slowik
Ana Slowik


Carl Seltzer

Son of Aizik and Chana. Born in Czenstochow on the 10th of April 1894. Came to America on the 4th of October 1912. He is a member of the Zionist Organization, Bnei Brith and of the Jewish National Workers Union. Lives in Houston, Texas. His two sons – Irving and Arthur – served in the American army.

H. Slowik
(photo, caption: Meir Goldberg)

Daughter of Meir Goldberg (Meir Zabiak), who was well known in Czenstochow and was a friend of everyone.

He greatly aided the sick and fed the poor during the First World War.

His children in America and in Canada always remember his name with great reverence.

[Translator's note: The above biographical sketch describes the life of H. Slowik in the first paragraph. The two remaining paragraphs seem to refer to Meir Goldberg.]


Nakhum (Cyncynatus) Senzer
(photo)

Son of Hershl and Chaya Sara. Born in Krzepice (Poland) December 1867. He married Dwoyra Ester Kremski. Came to America on the 10th of June 1914. He was active in the First Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim in New York and was the treasurer of its loan fund.

Nakhum Senzer died on the 5th of February 1944 and was buried in the cemetery of the First Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim. He left eight children (three daughters and five sons), 15 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

His daughter, Lili and her husband, Ruwin Baker, Aida and her husband, Lou Meizlin (live in New York), and Minnie and her husband, Faska Doimaz (live in France).

Dwoyra Ester (Cyncynatus) Senzer

Daughter of Mordekhai and Pese Kremski. Born 1872 in Czentochow. The wife of Nakhum Senzer. Came to America on the 12th of October 1920. She died on the 20th of March 1945 in New York. Is buried in the cemetery of the First Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim.


Abraham J. (Cyncynatus) Senzer
(photo)

Son of Nakhum and Dwoyra Ester. Born in Czenstochow on the 30th of January 1894. In his young years, in Europe, as a trade employee, he showed his activism with the founding of the illegal trade employees union of the S.S organization [Zionist Socialists]. He came to America on the 7th of July 1913.

He occupies a distinguished place in Jewish communal life in New York. For the past 25 years, he has been one of the most active members of the First Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim. During this time, he held the office of president, vice president, finance secretary and now he is its chairman for the cemetery. He was president of the Dzialoszyner Relief Committee in New York for 10 years, after the First World War. He is a member of the Czenstochower Arbeter Ring branch 261 and one of the founders of Arbeter Ring branch 324, as well as the Czenstochower Aid Union in New York and he was one of the founders and first vice president of the United Czenstochower Relief Committee in New York. He is now and has been president of the United Czenstochower Relief Committee for nine years. He is an active member of the Czenstochower Yidn book committee. Thanks to his activity, he has

[Page LXVII]

(photo, caption: Kremski Family – sitting from right to left: A.J. Senzer [President of Relief]) [Translator's note: Only one name is listed]


appeared on the administrative board of the American Federation of Polish Jews for 10 years; on the administrative board of the Joint Distribution Committee for the last

(photo, caption: Mordekhai and Pesa Kremski)

six years, on the administrative board of the ORT society for the last eight years, executive member of the Manhattan division of the American Jewish Congress, executive committee member of the World Jewish Congress and on the administrative committee of the Jewish Council of Russian War Relief in New York from its creation on.

He married Sadie Yakubowicz (Jacobs) in New York on the 5th of August 1917. They have three children: Israel – served in the American army, and daughters, Chaya Sara and Malka.


Sadie (Cyncynatus) Senzer

Daughter of Israel and Perl Yakubowicz (Jacobs). Born in Czenstochow on the 28th of March 1896. Came to America on the 20th of December 1912. She is the wife of Abraham Jakov Senzer.

Sadie Senzer is one of the most active women in Jewish communal life in New York. She is one of the founders of the Zialoshiner Ladies Auxiliary of the First Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim – was chairlady and vice president for a long time, and now executive member. She is one of the founders of the Czenstochower Aid Union and Czenstochower Ladies Auxiliary – was chairlady and now the secretary for many years; one of the most active members of the David Mayes malbesh-erumim [provides free clothes to the needy] – former vice president and Exec. Member; one of the founders of the Star Charity Sisters – was vice president, president and now treasurer and executive member. She is active on the Czenstochower Yidn book committee.


Irving (Iser Cyncynatus) Senzer
(photo)

Son of Nakhum and Dwoyra. Born in Czenstochow on the 17th of January 1901. He married Gitl Senzer. Came to America from Germany on the 23rd of January 1923. He a member of the Dzialoszyner Society, Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim and of the Czenstochower branch 11 of the Jewish Fraternal People's Order in New York.


Gitl (Gussy) (Cyncynatus) Senzer

Daughter of Abraham and Ita. Born on the 27th of March 1901 in Czenstochow. Came to America in June 1913. She was the wife of Irving Senzer. Was a member of the Zaloshiner Ladies Auxiliary and of the Jewish Fraternal People's Order.

Gitl Senzer died on the 2nd of June 1943 in New York.


Hershl Skowronek
(photo)


Died in Czenstochow in 1918 at the age of 55.


Reizl Skowronek
(photo)

Daughter of Berl and Chana Mass. Died in New York at the age of 61, April 1931.


Rafal Skowronek

Son of Hershl and Reizl. Died on the 12th of November 1936 in New York at the age of 44.

[Page LXVIII]

Isidor Skowronek
(photo)

Son of Hershl and Reizl. Died on the 2nd of March 1943 in New York at the age of 48.


Yeheil (Skowronek) Skowron

Son of Hershl and Reizl. Born on the 10th of June 1898 in Klobuck. Came to America on the 23rd of December 1921. He married Ester Cymerman. Is a member of the Czenstochower Young Men's Society in New York.


Aleks (Skowronek) Skowron

Son of Hersl and Reizl. Born in Klobuck on the 23rd of December 1899. Came to America on the 5th of August 1920. He married Gitl Drilings. He is a member of Czenstochower Young Men's Society in New York.

Jack (Skowronek) Skowron

Son of Hershl and Reizl. Born in Klobuck in 1902. He married Leah Klajn. Came to America on the 10th of December 1920. His son Harry served in the American army.


Joe (Josl) Litman
(photo)

Son of Reb Meir Yonah and Beila. Born in Czenstochow on the 18th of April 1898. Came to America in 1912. Married in London (England) in 1925. Vice President of the Lodz Organization in London.


Josef Nijinski

Son of Abraham and Sara. Father of Shimon. Born in Radoszyce (Poland). Died at the age of 92 in Przedborz (Poland) in 1915.


Return to Index

[Page LXVIII]

   

Wolf Enzel
Chicago

Yudl Ebersman
Piermont, N.Y.

(Photo)

Son of Mordekhai Josef and Rudl-Mindl. Born on the 28th of October 1880. Came to America in 1920.


Chana Evenson
Los Angeles, Cal.

Daughter of Abraham and Sheindl Malarski. Born in Novy Dvor on the 10th of July 1892. Came to America on the 24th of November 1908. Is active in Russian War Relief. She is a member of the Fraternal People's Order in Los Angeles.

Haim Enzel
(Photo)

Son of Asher and Chana. Born in Czenstochow, December 1890. Came to America in 1911. He was a member of the Czenstochower Young Men's Society in New York. Died in New York on the 23rd of June 1941.


Chana Enzel
(Photo)

Mother of Mikhal Wolf, Chena, Kreindl, Nakhman, Haim and Feigl. She died in Czenstochow in 1913.


Max Enzel
(Photo)

Son of Asher and Chana. Born on the 5th of August 1896 in Czenstochow. Came to America in 1912. He is a member of the Czenstochower Young Men's Society in New York.

[Page LXIX]

Asher Enzel

Father of Mikhal, Wolf, Chena, Kriendl, Nakhman, Haim and Feigl. He died in Czenstochow in 1917.


Lena Enzel
New York


Nathan Enzel
Chicago

Son of Israel and Chana. Born in Czenstochow on the 25th of October 1894. He married Lilia Szipper. Came to America in 1914. He is a member of the Czenstochower Educational Society in Chicago.


Abraham Essig

Died in 1908 in Czenstochow at the age of 85.

The grandfather of Ita Lentsher, N.Y.

(Photo)

Dwoyra Ester Essig
(née Sztrojm)

Died in 1906 in Czenstochow at the age of 80.

The grandmother of Ita Lentsher, N.Y.


Samuel Essig

Son of Hershl and Ruchl. Born in Czenstochow on the 16th of August 1892. Came to America on the 10th of September 1911. He is a member of the American Legion, Jewish War Veterans, Zionist Organization, B'nai B'rith and United Czenstochower Relief in New York.

His two sons served in the American Navy.


Shlomoh Yitzhak Epsztajn
(Photo)

Son of Ahron and Toba. Died at the age of 70 in 1932 in Noworadomsk.


Hershl Epsztajn
Los Angeles, Cal.

(Photo, caption: Hershl Epsztajn and R. Federman)

Son of Shlomoh Yitzhak and Tema. Born on the 27th of September 1888 in Noworadomsk. From 1903 to 1913, he was one of the most active members of the S.S. [Zionist Socialist] Party in Poland. In 1913, he came to America and joined Poalei-Zion and a Jewish Socialist Union. He is a member of the Arbeter Ring and the secretary of his branch for many years and he is active in the Jewish Workers Committee, the Unions Campaign, Histadrut and is one of the founders of Noworadomsker and Czenstochower Help Unions in Los Angeles. He is a devoted and responsible worker who draws appreciation and respect to himself. He married Sara Szarigrad. Their son served in the American navy.

Sara Epsztajn
Los Angeles, Cal.

(Photo)

Daughter of Israel Iser and Laya Szarigard. Born on the 17th of June 1891 in Noworadomsk. From 1903 to 1913 she belonged to the S.S. Party in Poland. Came to America in 1912.

Sara Epsztajn is a member of the Arbeter Ring, Rozenblat Loan Circle and Histadrut; she is also active in the Jewish Worker's Committee. She is one of the founders of the Noworadomsker and Czenstochower Help Unions.


Feigele Epsztajn
Los Angeles, Cal.

(Photo)

Daughter of Hershl and Sara. Born on the 19th of July 1926 in San Gabriel, California.


Israel Yitzhak Epsztajn

Son of Yehezkeil and Reizl. Born October 1881 in Czenstochow. Came to America in 1903. He is a member of the First Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim in New York and is an active executive member there. His son, Feiwl, served as a sergeant in the American army.


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[Page LXX]

   

Leibl and Mrs. Pakela

(Photo)

Iser (Pakula) Paul
Chicago

(Photo)

Son of Mendl and Reizl. Born in Tomaszow Mazowiecki on the 5th of October 1885. He married Chana Welner. Came to America on the 4th of May 1914. In Czenstochow he was active in the S.S. Party for years. He is a member of the Czenstochower Educational Union in Chicago, treasurer of an institution for the care of children in Chicago.


Welwl (Pakula) Paul
Chicago

(Photo, caption: the children of Welwl Pakula, Mendl and Ruchl)

Son of Mendl and Reizl. Born in Tomaszow Mazowiecki on the 1st of May 1888. He married Sheindl Grosman. Came to America on the 25th of March 1922. He and his wife are active members of the Czenstochower Educational Union and Aid Society in Chicago. Executive member for many years and active in the Relief Committee.

Their son, Mendl, served in the American army.


Abraham Pieprz

(Photo)

Son of Yitzhak Shlomoh and Freidl. Born in Koniecpol (Poland) in 1870. He died in Czenstochow in 1935.


Tessie (Toyba) and Max (Meir) Peper

(Photo)

Son of Abraham and Rina Pieprz. Born on the 14th of April 1900 in Czenstochow. He lived in Germany and France for many years. Came to America in 1919. He once belonged to the Arbeter Ring, then to the International Workers Order. Fifteen years ago, he was active in the Czenstochow Union in Detroit, was also active in the Fraternal Order in Los Angeles, Cal.; held various communal offices, now chairman of the Czenstochower Aid Union in Los Angeles.

His son, Sheldon Sam, born on the 14th of November 1920, served in the American army.

Max Peper now lives at 224 S. Poinsettia Place, Los Angeles, Cal.


Chaya Sara Pozner

Daughter of Yakov and Ester. Born in Czenstochow in 1902. Came to America in 1920. Belonged to the International Order, ICOR, the Garelik loan circle, ICUF. Occupies the office of secretary of the Garelik loan circle. She is the wife of Rafal Pozner.


Rafal Pozner

Son of Yeheil Yitzhak and Perl Yehudis. Born in Litomiersk in 1898. Lived in France, Germany, Belgium, Cuba, Mexico and Guatemala in South America before coming to America. Came to North America in 1926.


Reb Josef Prokosz, may he rest in peace
(Josele Kir'a)

He was known as Reb Josele Kir'a in Czenstochow. He was one of the genuine Jews who are now almost impossible to find.

Modest, calm by nature, he only had good friends in Czenstochow and there was no one in the city who would speak a bad word about him. He decided matters of rabbinical laws and was a member of the Czenstochower rabbinate.

Reb Josele was one of the greatest scholars in Czenstochow, sitting day and night in the study of rabbinical law. Often he had to be reminded of meals – he was so absorbed in study. His house was always a meeting place in which the learned came together. People from the entire city came to him to ask questions and to study, and to seek his advice in various matters, such as lawsuits before the rabbinical court. And he was a "loose constructionist" in deciding questions of kashrus [the laws of what is kosher]. It was very hard for him to utter the word treif [not kosher].

[Page LXXI]

Reb Josef Prokosz was born in 1872 in Galicia. He was brought to Czenstochow by the wealthy man, Reb Notl Pankowski, who was well known in our city, to teach his children and sons-in-law. He lived in Czenstochow from that time on and married the daughter of Reb Hersh Yoal Amstower.

The entire Jewish population loved and valued him regardless of their political persuasion; Reb Josele Kir'a was one of the Czenstochower middle class in whom Czenstochower prided itself. He suffered the fate of the martyrs in 1939-1945.

May his soul be bound up in the bond of eternal life!


Gershon Preger, may he rest in peace

(Photo)

Came to Czenstochower from Brisk in 1911. Became known as a Zionist and communal worker in our city. Took part in the development of the Jewish metal industry in Czenstochow.

Died in Czenstochow in 1942.


Yudl Pittel
Chicago

Son of Shlomoh Meir and Gitl. Born in Czenstochow on the 18th of July 1889. Came to America on the 26th of July 1912. He is a member of the Czenstochower Aid Society in Chicago.


Binyamin Pinkus

Son of Ahron and Genendl. Born on the 1st of July 1880 in Czenstochow.

Polya Pilin

(Photo)

Born in Czenstochow. Attended the Czenstochower Y.L. Peretz School. Came to America in 1930 and here she became famous as a painter. She had exhibits in New York, Chicago and in other places and was warmly received everywhere.

(Photos of painting, captions:
“Chicago Side Street” by Polya Pilin
“New Mexico Life” by Polya Pilin)

[Page LXXII]

Leizer Pajnski
Detroit

Son of Izrael Moshe and Chava. Born in Czenstochow on the 5th of December 1900. He married Chaya Szuldinger. Came to America on the 18th of February 1921. In Czenstochow, he was active in the United S.S.organization. He is president of the Sosnowicer and Bendiner [Bedzin] Society and was president of and an active member of the Czenstochower Regional Union. His son, Max, and his son-in-law, Saul Fiszman, served in the American army.


Pesi Prodel
Chicago

(Photo, caption: Pesi Prodel with her family)

Daughter of Hershl and Chaya Kaplan. Born in Lubin* (Lublin County) on the 10th of March 1905. Came to America on the 12th of May 1914. She is the chairlady of the Czenstochower Aid Society and Vice President of the Czenstochower Educational Union in Chicago. She is one of the most devoted and active workers of the Czenstochower organizations in Chicago; she is active in all of the campaigns carried out by the organizations.

[*Translator's note: the town is given as Lubin, the county as Lublin.]


Perl Pelc

(Photo, caption: Oren Pelc with his wife, Perl)

Daughter of Yitzhak and Malka Gelber. Born in Czenstochow in 1872.


[Page LXXII]

   

Dobra Feiwlowicz
(Photo)

Daughter of Nakhum and Miriam. Died at age 89 in Czenstochow.


Toba Feiwlowicz
Chicago

(Photo)

Daughter of Abo and Dobra. Born in Czenstochow in 1886. Came to America in 1913.


Meir Feiwlowicz
(Photo)

Born in Czenstochow in 1888. He worked in Werde's needle factory (Igliarnia) where a large number of Jewish workers were employed (approximately 30 percent). Meir belonged to the Poalei-Zion Party and was a member of the city committee. In 1904 he helped to organize the workers in the needle factory and founded the illegal metal industry union.

He left for Lodz because of the persecution of his family. There he was active in the Bund under the pseudonym, “the dark Meir.” In 1905 he returned to Czenstochow after the “bloody Wednesday” in Lodz and again joined Poalei-Zion.

Once he was chosen to transport a May 1st appeal. He was arrested with another comrade, Yakov Wajgensburg (now in Philadelphia). He passed himself off as a lace maker, taking the entire responsibility on himself and served 11½ months in prison. He was arrested again in 1906 and escaped from the barracks in which he was held. The soldiers shot at him and a bullet hit his foot. He was caught because he left traces of blood and was taken to the hospital. Again he escaped from there and stayed in Vienna for a time and came back to Czenstochow.

He was again arrested with 38 people in an ambush of the S.S. Party's “Golda's Teahouse.” And again – trial and prison.

After his release from prison, he again left for Vienna where he worked in a factory and was active in the Poalei-Zion Party.

[Page LXXIII]

He came to America in 1914 and was active in the Poalei-Zion Party and in the Czenstochower Arbeter Ring branch in Chicago. Later, he joined the leftist movement and joined the International Workers Order. He was also active in ICOR from the start and very actively took part in Czenstochow aid work.


Godl Frajtag
(Photo)

Born in 1895 in Czenstochow. His father – Yitzhak Moshe – was a tailor. His first childhood experience was the pogrom of 1902. He was then studying in Hercka the malamed's kheder [in a teacher's religious school]. On the day of the pogrom, his mother, Khasha, disguised as a Christian, came to take him home. At that time they lived in Weksler's house at Alee 6 – one of the largest houses in Czenstochow, with two courtyards and two iron gates. Many Jews hid their “bag and baggage” here.

During the October strike and the proclamation of the Czarist Constitution of 1905, Godl Frajtag led a procession of children with a red paper flag that his father had made for him.

At age 13, he began as an employee at a colonial business and in 1912 he joined the Poalei-Zion Party. Hipek Gajzler (later Dr. Hipolit Gajzler), who lived with his parents at Alee 4 and there created a learning circle for children [whose parents were] not well-to-do, taught him in the evening.

In 1914, during the First World War, he lived with his parents on Pilsudski (earlier Dajazd) 27. Poalei-Zion began to organize like the other parties. The first meetings took place in Avraham Gotlib's house and in Shimeon Waldfogl's small room. When the workers house was created, he was working at “Fridn's Hute,” near Boitin, in Germany. There, he took an active part in the creation of a cultural and support union. The following Czenstochowers were elected to the managing committee of the union: Brakman, Lewenhof, Fajerman, Feldman, Godl Frajtog and Berl (his family name is forgotten).

In 1917 Godl Frajtag returned to Czenstochow, was a railroad worker, joined the metal union that was organized by the S.S. [Zionist Socialists]; he was elected as a member of the managing committee. He and his partner, Comrade Rinya Gros, later Mr. Szlezinger, won first prize during a “flower day” [a fundraising event].

In 1918 the creation of cooperatives began. Godl Frajtag became an employee at the “Workers Home” cooperative (of P.Z.) and one of the most active Poalei-Zion workers in Czenstochow. He was elected as a delegate to the workers council of the trade employees; he took an active part with Shimkhah Rajkh in the election to the first City Council to which P.Z. elected two councilmen. He helped create the “Borokow Children's Home” and the low-priced kitchen at the children's home and was active in the trade workers union. His party membership did not prevent him from working with other parties in wide-ranging communal undertakings.

During the split in the P.Z. Party in 1921 into Rightist – under the leadership of Dr. Sziper, and Leftist – under the guidance of Zerubavel, Godl Frajtag remained with the Rightists who occupied the workers' home meeting hall. However, they were a minority and were excluded from the party. They organized themselves into a separate party, using the residence of Comrade Wajn as a meeting place.

G. F. took part in the Palestine office in 1923/24, as the representative of the Rightist Poalei-Zion and with emigration to Eretz-Yisroel. He was a supporter of haksharah [agricultural training for those preparing to emigrate to Palestine] and Hahalutz [the pioneer movement] in Linkawa, near Piotrkow, created by the Czenstochower P.Z.

At his departure from Czenstochow for Eretz-Yisroel in 1925, the Right as well as the Left Poalei-Zion took part in the banquet in his honor. Leon Zajdman, leader of the Left P.Z., dedicated a song to him and Shimkhah Rajkh gave him a memento for his devoted work in the name of the party.

His organizational activity in Eretz-Yisroel began with the creation of Kvutse Frajtag [Frajtag Collective]. There was a group of Czenstochowers who worked, with the support of Histadrut, building houses as a collective group. Their first work was building Abo Librowicz's house. When the Czenstochower immigrants to Eretz-Yisroel organized a separate landsmanschaftn union and, later, when the organization, Olei Czenstochow [Czenstochow Immigrants], was created, he was the first to help with the organizational work and was elected to the managing committee of Olei Polnia [Polish Immigrants] with Moshe Zilberszac. In 1929 he was elected Chairman of the Czenstochower Landmanschaft Union in Tel Aviv and Rabbi Yeshai (the Walner Rabbi) – Honorary President. In 1931 he took part in creating a bank for Polish Jews in Eretz-Yisroel.

After the house building work ended, the Czenstochower group, Kvutse Frajtag, built roads (highway work), then G.F. created a tea packing business and exported his tea to various parts of the world: Africa, America, Canada, France, etc. His tea firm received awards at the world exhibition in Tel Aviv in 1929 and in Paris – in 1931. In 1932 he visited France, Belgium and Poland and organized the export of an entire series of manufactured goods to Eretz-Yisroel. His fervent love for Jewish Czenstochow never ended. He visited Czenstochow twice, the last time in 1937. He wrote for the Czenstochower Zeitung and for Undzer Weg [Our Way] (Zionist weekly in Czenstochow] and

[Page LXXIV]

spread the Czenstochower Yiddish newspapers to Eretz-Yisroel. He met many Czenstochower landsleit [countryman] on his trips through various countries and he campaigned for the idea of creating Czenstochower colony in Eretz-Yisroel and a world union of Czenstochower landsleit from all parts of the world.

During the Second World War, he did everything possible to organize aid campaigns for Czenstochowers and to help the Czenstochower refugees in the Soviet Union and in other nations. He greatly helped with the publication of the historical book, Czenstochower Yidn, with collections of money and reports about the lives of the Czenstochower landsleit in Eretz-Yisroel.

In 1939, when the militia, Mishmar Ezrahi [National Guard], was created, Godl Frajtag was one of the founders and members. Now he has received an award for his five years of service. His daughter is one of Mishmar Ezrahi's youngest officers.


Reb Akiva Fogel, of blessed memory
(Photo)

He came to Czenstochow from Lask, near Lodz. He studied in Amstow near Czenstochow and in his youth he had a reputation as a child prodigy. He was involved with charity and good deeds for the poor in our city and always was studying. He was also a founder of the first manufacturing business in Czenstochow.

He died in Czenstochow in 1940 and was buried there.

May his soul be bound up in the bond of eternal life.


Mendl Fogel

Born in Lask in 1880 (near Lodz). Took an active part in the communal life of Czenstochow; was president of Agudas Yisroel and the synagogue warden for the Jewish community.

Suffered the fate of the martyrs in 1939-1945.


Abraham Fox
Detroit

Son of Akiva and Leah. Born in Czenstochow in 1893. He married Jenny Krakowski. Came to America in 1921. He was the manager of the Left Poalei-Zion cooperative in Czenstochow. He was also one of the founders of the Czenstochower Regional Union in Detroit. He was the secretary of the Union until 1938. His wife, Jenny, is active in the Ladies Circle of the Jewish People's Order and in the Yiddish schools of the People's Order in Detroit.

Sam Finkel
(Photo)


Son of Yehuda Moshe and Ita Beila. Born on the 22nd of December 1882 in Zawiercie; later, he lived in Czenstochow. Came to America on the 16th of November 1906. Belonged to branch 90 of the International Workers Order, co-founder of the Federation of Polish Jews and on the administrative committee of the Jewish Congress, as well as the United Jewish Appeal; one of the founders of the Jewish section of Russian War Relief; former active worker in the bakers union; co-founder of the Bendin [Bedzin]-Sosnowiecer Society and Fraternal Order of Bendin-Sosnowiec.

In 1938, Sam Finkel traveled to the Soviet Union (he won the cost of the trip in the campaign for the Morgn-Freiheit [Morning Freedom]).

Sam Finkel (Shmelke the baker) married Malka Urman of Bedzin. He was a baker for 12 years, helped to organize the bakers union in Bedzin, Dombrowa [Dabrowa Gornicza], Sosnowiec and Czenstochow; belonged to the central managing committee; first he was a member of the Bund, later – of the S.D.K.P.L. [Social Democracy of the Kingdom of Poland and Lithuania]; he was arrested in Bedzin in 1905 and spent 22 weeks in jail, then was exiled to Minsk. After returning to Czenstochow, he left for America. Here he was a member of branch 261 of the Arbeter Ring. During the split – he left for the International Workers Order.


Berl Finkel

Son of Shmuel and Rywka Finkel. Born in Czenstochow. His father was a Hebrew teacher in the Talmud Torah there. In 1924, he went to Eretz-Yisroel and there he worked in the Easterner's Arya Yehuda Collective. He came to America in 1928 where he worked with ladies' belts in New York.


Dave Finkel

Son of Yitzhak Meir and Chaya. Born in 1879. The family consisted of eight children – five daughters and three sons. Dave was the oldest. He studied sign painting. Worked with the famous painters, Cymberknop and Zalcman. Came to America in 1900. Here he married Josie Levit of Wielun in 1915. He is an active member of the Wieluner Society. He was president a few times and also held other offices. He is also a member of the Czenstochower Relief Committee and always helps with the work. His son-in-law, Willie Goldberg, was a lieutenant in the American army.


Sadie Fishel

Daughter of Nukham and Miriam. Died born* in Kamik in 1913. [*Translator's note: both the words “died” and “born” appear at the beginning of the sentence.] Belonged to the Szczekociner Society.

Her son and son-in-law – both officers – served in the American army.

[Page LXXV]

Zalman Fajner
(Photo)

Son of Yakov Meir and Odel; the father of Meir. Born in Amstow. He died at age 42, March 1904 in Czenstochow.


Beila (Kantor) Fajner
(Photo)

Daughter of Aitche and Chena; mother of Meir. She died at the age of 63, in 1931 in Czenstochow.


Meir Fajner

Son of Zalman and Beila. Born in Czenstochow on the 15th of May 1895. He marred Royza Wisocki. He was in London and in Canada before coming to America on the 4th of September 1916. He is an active executive member of the Czenstochower br. 261 of the Arbeter Ring and active member of United Czenstochower Relief in New York.


Meir Fajner

Son of Yakov Meir and Odel; born in Wielun. His wife, Feigel Fajner, and their children perished in Treblinka as martyrs in the sanctification of God's name.

Cudek Fajner
(Photo)

Born in Czenstochow in 1902. He and his wife and children perished in 1945 in a concentration camp in Germany at the hands of the German barbarians.


Philip Fajertag
Detroit

(Photo)

Son of Nota and Sarah. Born in Czenstochow, December 1886. Came to America in 1913. He is a member of the Arbeter Ring in Detroit. His son, Max, served in the American army.


Ruchl Fajersztajn
(Photo)

Daughter of Moshe and Sheindl Grinberg and wife of Avraham Zalman Fajersztajn. Died at the age of 58 in 1921, in Amstow.


Avraham Zalman Fajersztajn

Born in Olsztin. Died at the age of 32 in 1882, in Czenstochow.


Brukhia Fajersztajn
(Photo)

Son of Avraham and Ruchl. Died in Czenstochow.


Harry Fajersztajn
(Photo)

Son of Avraham Zalman and Ruchl. He was born in Amstow on the 6th of May 1881. He lived in Lodz. He married Frida Szpic of Czenstochow in 1907. Came to America on the 4th of July 1909. He is an executive member of the First Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim, member of the Dzialoszyner Relief Committee, Zionist Organization, Young Israel, of the Czenstochower Aid Union, of United Czenstochower Relief Committee, of which he is vice president and of the Czenstochower Yidn book committee.

His family consists of three children. His son, Sidney, married Sybil Seiman; his daughter, Rose, married Sam Bagatel and his son, Joe, married Minnie Szeftel. Joe was a lieutenant in the American army.

[Page LXXVI]

Fanny Fajersztajn
(Photo)

Daughter of Yeheil and Rotza Szpic. Born on the 15th of April 1887 in Czenstochow. She married Harry Fajersztajn on 25th of December 1907 and came to America in June 1910. She is a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim, Hospital for Incurable Diseases in Brooklyn, Rouz-Rubel Society in Flatbush and of the Ladies Auxiliary of Czenstochower Relief, as well as the Czenstochower Yidn book committee. For several years, she has held the office of vice president of the Ladies Auxiliary and is one of its most active women who does work for the old home [Czenstochow].


Moshe Leib Fajersztajn
(Photo)

Son of Hershl and Feigl. Born on the 10th of March 1890 in Czenstochow. Came to America in 1925. He is a member of the Jewish National Workers Union in Omaha, Hebrew Club and the Zionist Organization of America.

Hershl Fajersztajn
(Photo)

Born in Czenstochow in 1878. Was one of the founders and treasurer of Czenstochower branch 261 of the Arbeter Ring; also a member and one of the founders of Czenstochower Relief.

Died on the 31st of October 1938.


Chana Fajersztajn
(Photo)

Daughter of Yankl Kremski. Born in Czenstochow. She married Hershl Fajersztajn and came with him to America in 1906. The family consisted of six children.

The first executive meetings of the Aid Union and of Relief were held in Chana Fajersztajn's home. She is also a member of the Czenstochower Ladies Auxiliary in New York.


Zalman Frydman
(Photo)

Son of Avraham. Died in Czenstochow.

Samuel Fajerman
Detroit

(Photo)

Son of Meir and Feigl. Born in Zarki (Poland) on the 17th of May 1894. He married Esther Fajerman. Came to America from England on the 7th of February 1922. He is a member of the Jewish Fraternal Peoples Order, branch 42, in Detroit.

(Photo, caption: Esther Fajerman)


Heinrikh Frojlich
St. Louis, Missouri

(Photo)

Son of Yitzhak and Nisel. Born in Czenstochow on the 25th of September 1884. Came to America on the 21st of December 1904. Member of the B'nai Brit organization. Was one of the founders of the Czenstochower Union in New York, was also the secretary of the Czenstochower branch 261 of the Arbeter Ring.

[Page LXXVII]

Gela Hinda Frydman
(Photo)

Born in Czenstochow; died there January 1904.


Feigl Frydman
(Photo)

Daughter of Shlomoh and Ester Goldberg. Born 1893 in Czenstochow. She came to America in 1917. She died in a tragic accident on the 3rd of January 1922 in New York.


Zisl Frydman
Chicago

(Photo)

Daughter of Itche and Cyrl Kusi. Born in Gorzkowice in 1873. Came to America from Czenstochow in 1927. She is a member of the Czenstochower Educational Society and of the Aid Society in Chicago.


Sarah Ruchl Frydman

Daughter of Yitzhak Jakov and Leah Kozak. Died at the age of 47, in 1904, in Czenstochow.


Abraham Frydman

Son of Zalman and Sarah Ruchl. Born on the 4th of July 1878 in Czenstochow. He married Helen Kremsdorf. Came to America in August 1903. He is a member of the Czenstochower Young Men's Society and of United Czenstochower Relief in New York. His son, Harry, served in the American army.

(Photo)

Helen Frydman

Daughter of Yudl and Chava Kremsdorf. Born in Czenstochow on the 15th of January 1886. Came to America on the 22nd of September 1902. She is very active in communal life – in the Woman's Division of HIAS, treasurer of the general board of the Kremsdorf Family Circle and [active] in the activities of the Czenstochower Ladies Auxiliary; member of the Czenstochower Yidn book committee and of the Concourse Center Sisterhood.

Helen Frydman is one of the founders of the Czenstochower Ladies Auxiliary in New York.


Nusan Avigdor Federman

Son of Itche and Pesa Tzitl. Born in Przyrow (Poland). He died at the age of 70, 1914, in Czenstochow.


Meir Shimon (Sam) Federman
Chicago

Son of Nusan Avigdor and Toba. Born in Przyrow in 1885. Came to America from Czenstochow in 1906. He is a member of Hebrew Progressive and the Czenstochower Educational Society in Chicago. His son, Nathan, served in the American army.


Dovid Zalman Federman
Chicago

(Photo)

Son of Nusan Avigdor and Toba Hinda. Born in Przyrow (Poland) 1884. He married Ruchl Saks and came to America in 1910. He is a member of the Bendiner [Bedzin] Society, Hebrew Progressive and of the Czenstochower Educational Society in Chicago.


Nakhum Yankl Frydman
(Photo)

Son of Abraham Nusan and Freidl. Born in Warsaw in 1870. He married Zisl Kisy. Came to America in 1920. He was a member of the Czenstochower Neighborhood Society in Chicago; died there in 1940


Moshe Frejlech

Father of Shlomoh, Zisl, Joe, Etl, Emanual, Chava and Avraham Hirsh.

Ruchl Mitler and Leah Garber.

He died in 1907 in Czenstochow.


[Page LXXVIII]

Joe Frejlech

Son of Moshe and Chaya. Born in Czenstochow in 1891. He married Etl Pieprz in 1912. Came to America in 1912. He is a member of the Bakers Union, local 169 and executive member of branch 307 of the Jewish Fraternal People's Order.


Emanuel Frejlech

Son of Moshe and Chaya. Born in Czenstochow in 1895. He married Chaya Frejlech in 1920. Came to America in 1923. His son, Morris, was a volunteer soldier in the American army.


Abraham Hersh Frejlech

[Translator's note: his given names are spelled as Avraham Hirsh in the biography of his father and as Abraham Hersh in his biography.)

Son of Dovid and Sarah. Born in Czenstochow in 1904. He came to America in 1920 and is a member of the Czenstochower branch 11 of the Jewish Fraternal People's Order.


Abraham Fefer
(Photo)

Son of Moshe and Ester. Born in Czenstochow on the 1st of May 1888. Came to America in December 1911. He is a member of the Czenstochower Young Men's Society in New York.


Yakov Frajermauer

Died in 1918 in Czenstochow at the age of 85.


Relia and Tuvya Frajmor
(Photo)

Son of Yakov and Riva. Born in Czenstochow in 1897. Came to America in 1914. He belongs to the Wloszczower Society. He is a dress operator.

Relia Frajmor was born in a small shtetl near Czenstochow. At the age of 9, she came to Czenstochow where she was drawn into communal work and joined the S.S. [Socialist Zionist] Party whose leader there was Rafal Federman. Reila, under the influence of Federman, who had gone over to the Bund, also joined this party. In 1924 she came to America. Due to family matters, she withdrew from communal work. She raised her children as a member of a Jewish socialist party should; they went to a Yiddish school. She, herself, is a member of Arbeter Ring School. For a time she was the chairlady there.

When R. Federman came to America and began his activities, Relia was again drawn into the work. She became a member of Czenstochower Relief, where she is an executive member. She is also a member of the Czenstochower Ladies Auxiliary.


Leib and Lina Frajermauer

Son of Yokl and Frayda. Born on the 20th of October 1885 in Czenstochow. Came to America in 1906. Member of Young Men's. His two sons, Max and Abe, served in the American army.


Hershl Frajtag
(Photo)

Reb Hershl Frajtag was a well known name in Czenstochow. He was the shamas in the “German Synagogue” for five years. But before the synagogue was built, he was the shamas for a minyon that was called “Reikher's [rich man's] minyon” on First Avenue 10, to which the Czenstochower aristocracy belonged, such as Rajkher, Weirnik, Henig, Werda, Herc, Grosman, Markusfeld, Grodsztajn, Frojnd, Imik and others. This minyon built the “German Synagogue” (New Synagogue) in 1894. The land for the synagogue was donated by Henig.

Reb Hershl Frajtag died in 1935 at the age of 107. Godl Frajtag, his grandson, is in Eretz-Yisroel


Return to Index

[Page LXXVIII]

   

Aizik Cymerman
Australia

Born in Czenstochow. He graduated from the Folks-Shul [secular, public school], attended the Mickiewicz and Szudejka gymnazie and studied jurisprudence at the Warsaw and Krakow Universities. He was active in Jewish academic circles during his last 15 years as a student

(Photo)

and in building a Jewish academic home in Warsaw.

He settled in Lodz in 1924. He practiced as an attorney. He was active in communal life as vice president of the Central Artisans Union (Poludniowa 4) in Lodz; worked in the academic council of the Jewish World Congress under Dr. Tartakower; co-founder of the club for Jewish intelligenica and founder

[Page LXXIX]

of the Jewish Lawyers Union in Lodz and the first president; where in 1933, Dr. Comersztajn founded an all Polish Council for Jewish Lawyers in order to help to defend the position of Jewish lawyers in the Sejm. Cymerman was the representative on the council from Lodz. In Lodz he was also active as a writer on current public matters.

As a refugee in Vilna, Lawyer Cymerman was one of the founders of the home for the intelligencia.

In 1941, he came to Japan through Russia and there worked on the Jewish Refugee Committee as the administrative director. In August 1941, he came to Australia, where he occupies a distinguished position in Jewish communal life.

He is the co-editor of the only Jewish newspaper, Sidney Jewish News, and was the honorary secretary of the Jewish World Congress for four years. He founded the Federation of Polish Jews in Australia and is a member of the Board of Deputies. He is one of the founders of the Aid Fund for European Jews.

Lawyer Cymerman's articles and columns of a political, social and literary character were constantly published in the Australian press.


Isidor Cwern
Chicago

(Photo)

Son of Josef and Chaya. Born in Czenstochow on the 16th of October 1888. He married Gitl Kirszenboim. Came to America from Belgium on the 10th of April 1909. He is one of the founders and a member of the Czenstochower Independent Union in Chicago and was Finance Secretary for four years.


Mordekhai Ceszniewski

Died at age 77 in 1928 in Czenstochow.


Ester Ceszniewski

Died at age 76 in 1927 in Czenstochow.


Bluma Ceszynski
(Photo)

Born in Komarna, Galicia in the month of Chesvan. Her father, Reb Yitzhak Lemberg, was a Hasid of the Belzer Rebbe. Bluma was raised in a very frum [pious] house. In 1914 she left her home at a very young age and lived, worked and studied in Paris and in Berlin. Came to America in 1923, settled in New York. She now lives in Chicago. She is the wife of Moshe Ceszinki.


Moshe (Moshe C.) Ceszynski
(Photo)

His parents, observant Jewish people, who lived at Garncarska 58 – belonged to the luminous Jewish figures, who in the greatest poverty – did not renounce the privilege of paying tuition for their children. Therefore, Moshe, one of three brothers and one sister, went to a kheder [religious school], not to the Talmud Torah [religious school for poor children]. And tuition was also paid for the yom-tovim [religious holidays], because just like every Jew – his father, Yakov Ceszynski, reasoned

(Photo, caption: Yakov and Ester Feigl Ceszynski)

with his mother, Ester Feigl – the teacher also has to celebrate yom-tov.

In addition to studying in a kheder, Moshe studied Russian, Polish and a little German in a city Folks-shul [public school]. At 15, he began to work. Thanks to his father, who was a Mizrakhi [a member of the Orthodox Zionist group] and took his son to Zionist meetings – he already knew about Dr. Herzl and his ideal, Zionism. However, more than Di Velt [The World] from Vienna, Der Yid [The Jew] from Krakow and other Zionist pamphlets that he read – the Dreyfus trial and the pogroms on the Jews in Russia and Poland had an effect on him.

(Photo, caption: Moshe Ceszynski's brother)

In 1904 Moshe Ceszynski joined the Poalei-Zion Party and took part in all of the struggles and dangers of the revolutionary movement of that time. He remained active and devoted to his idea for all of the time he was in Czenstochow and also now in America.

In 1910 he was the Czenstochower correspondent for the Warsaw Moment under the editorship of Zwi Prilucki. Even earlier, he was a correspondent for the Warsaw newspapers, Der Weg [The Way] and Undzer Lebn [Our Life]. His pseudonym, Moshe C., comes from these reports.

[Page LXXX]

Carrying out educational work in the Poalei-Zionist circles during the revolutionary years – he later took part in the cultural work of the Jewish Literary Society and supported every cultural undertaking.

From 1912, Moshe Ceszynski was one of the first pioneers and most important co-workers in the Jewish press in Czenstochow, beginning with the Czenstochower Reklamen-Blat [Advertising (News)paper], Woknblat [Weekly (News)paper] and Togeblat [Daily (News)paper]. He helped in the greatest measure its rise with his terrific energy and bursting momentum and planted his roots in the Jewish life of Czenstochow. He ignored the great difficulties that stood in its way. After the First World War, he also supported the Czenstochower Yiddish press morally and materially.

In America, he collected, took care of and gave special attention to the publications of the weekly and daily editions of the Yiddish newspapers in Czenstochow. An entire series of material for the book, Czenstochower Yidn, was taken from the newspapers that Moshe Ceszynski collected.

In 1913 he took part in the World Poalei-Zion Conference in Krakow as the delegate from Czenstochow.

The Russian gendarmerie kept an eye on him, particularly because of the many published newspaper statements about workers' lives. In 1914 he was arrested with the managing committee of the Professional Union of Bakers for his public appearance at one of their meetings and served several months in jail.

Moshe Ceszynski left for America in 1914, on the eve of the First World War. He immediately found a wide-ranging field for his communal activities in New York and was one of the founders of the Czenstochower branch 11 of the Jewish National Workers Union.

In 1915, his brochure, Prison Memories, was published in New York. His main employment at the time he was in New York was traveling agent for various Yiddish book publishing houses and newspaper distributors. He traveled through cities and towns and filled homes with classic books: Mendele, Sholom Aleichem, Peretz and young Yiddish poets.

(Photo, caption: Hinda Rajch, wife of Elkhanan, Moshe Ceszynski 's sister. Died in Czenstochow.)

(Photo, caption: Elkhanan Rajch, brother-in-law of Moshe Ceszynski. Died in Warsaw.)

In 1922, Moshe Ceszynski settled in Chicago. There he was bound with Bina Ceszynski . She came from Kremenitz. She was raised in her birthplace more in Russian than in Yiddish. Upon coming to Chicago in 1914, she learned a juicy Yiddish and took part in the work of the National Workers Circle. She was particularly devoted to the Jewish Children's School. Bina Ceszynski was one of the founders of the Macabee School in Chicago; she assisted in the creation of the Sholom Aleichem branch of the Jewish National Workers Union, where she was the executive member and was also an aid worker. Politically, she was a sympathizer of the Left Poalei-Zion movement.

The same year in Chicago, Moshe Ceszynski 's bookstore was established, which was the center in Chicago for Jewish readers, writers and intelligencia from all directions.

Discussions never stopped in Moshe Ceszynski 's bookstore – they took place from early morning to late in the night. Poets corrected their manuscripts, painters sketched their illustrations, plans for literary works were made, meetings were held, for among others, the Czenstochower Aid Union in Chicago.

At the same time, Moshe Ceszynski 's bookstore was also a world center for writers and book publishers from all over the world; writers from Poland, Eretz-Yisroel, Mexico and Argentina, who visited America, did not fail to pay a visit to M.C.'s bookshop – to learn world literary news, make plans and buy rare bargains. M.C.'s bookstore also stood in an authorial relationship with Yiddish writers, publishers and cultural institution across the entire world.

Moshe Ceszynski himself published articles covering political, communal and literary matters in a wide range of newspapers and journals in Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Toronto, Buenos Aires and so on.

*

In 1931, he started a new period of his life. He started a publishing house and published Yiddish books – “Moshe Ceszynski's Book Publishing House in Chicago.” With the large number of published books, the publishing house occupied a treasured place on the literary world map. Due to the circumstances in America, he spent a lot of money on it. However, the Ceszynskis were not disappointed by it and did not remain detached from the work.

From 1931 to 1942, his publishing house published around 50 books by European and American writers. Among the more well known editions, Leivik's song, From the Garden of Eden; Fishl Bimko's nine volumes of dramas; Rywka Kalin's song, Teibele; Sholom Szwarcbord's two volumes of memoirs; Dr. Poliszik's two volume, The Development of Consciousness and the Process of Knowledge; Dr. Israel Marcus's Chosen

[Page LXXXI]

Pearls of Our Cultural Treasures and others.

Ceszynski's book editions were sent to all of the Jewish centers in Europe. The publications were sent to many European cultural institutions free of charge. All that was needed was a request and the desire to read and support the Yiddish word.

In general, Moshe Ceszynski's innumerable activities with Yiddish books and for the Yiddish word were too many to enumerate – but one of them must be remembered here – because it does not have a connection to Jews living in various countries, but to Jews on their way – Jewish emigrants. M.C. contacted the ship companies in many nations with a circular asking that they establish Yiddish sections in their ship libraries for the large number of Jewish passengers they carry. His message should be an example for our large and influential Jewish organizations.

*

In Chicago, Max Ceszynski was one of the first members of YIVO (Institute for Jewish Research). Earlier, he had sent an entire series of books and material and a small amount of money to YIVO in Vilna to support Jewish writers, although because of this he had to forgo many personal needs.

He was active in the Chicago Cultural Society and helped create the Society for Jewish Culture; is a member of the Sholom Aleichem branch of the Jewish National Workers Union; is a member of the Sholom Aleichem Institute; assists in the work of the various types of Yiddish schools, such as: Sholom Aleichem schools, Arbeter Ring schools, Farband schools and others. He took an active part in the Chicago division of the American Federation of Polish Jews, where he was an executive member for several years; he is one of the founders and the secretary of the Czenstochower Independent Union and was active in the aid work for Czenstochow during his entire time in Chicago.

M. Ceszynski was the executive of the landsmanschaftn for workers in Eretz-Yisroel for several years.

*

In addition to the founding of their book selling business, the Ceszynskis, Moshe and Bina, began collecting books and rare editions for their private library. His agents in Europe bought the best cultural treasures for him. Over the years, he successfully collected a giant library that was well known in Chicago. Many writers would come to their house, where the library occupied a separate room, to search for information for their literary work.

The good and patient Bina Ceszynski gave the library her unlimited effort and attention; even when she was sick, day in and day out, she dusted the thousands of books and publications and kept them in order.

In December 1934, a banquet for the Sholom Aleichem Institute was arranged by a large group of friends, writers and cultural workers with the Ceszynskis as the main luminaries. A large number of friends, readers, writers and cultural workers took part in the banquet. The large number of greetings from distinguished personalities, writers and cultural workers from America and from other countries showed the Yiddish literary world's appreciation for the devotion of the Ceszynskis.

Bina Ceszynski died of a heart ailment in December 1936. Moshe Ceszynski lost his wife, most faithful friend and colleague in all of his undertakings.

Even more than Moshe Ceszynski, their home library remained an orphan after her death and it remained in a storage house for many years. Nothing came of the negotiations with the Sholom Aleichem Institute in Chicago, with the Beis Hamidresh L'Torah Library and other institutions to include the library on their premises. It was through the initial mediation of Mendl Elkin that the library found a place at the Institute for Jewish Research (YIVO), 535 West 135th Street in New York (YIVO). The “Bina Ceszynski Library” is located in the YIVO building together with the library of Kalmen Marmor. There are many interesting old manuscripts, fine art pictures, statues and the like among the books. There is in the same room a fine art portrait of Bina Ceszynski painted by the Chicago Jewish artist, Sam Beyer, in memory of the deceased.

In 1942, Moshe Ceszynski married his second wife – Bluma Weiner, who comes from a Hasidic family from Komarno (Galicia). Her father was called Mirel Leah's Reb Itsik [Mirel Leah's son]. The Yiddish language and culture and other European languages are strangers to Bluma Weiner Ceszynski.

To everything that has been said about Moshe Ceszynski, or his popular name, “Moshe C,” must be added one quality, perhaps the greatest and most beautiful compliment for a person: He never – in his youth, or now, in his older years –politically, socially and personally – was embittered, did not carry out plots against anyone. He was always everyone's friend and everyone's comrade.


Ceszynski Collection in the Central Library and Archive of YIVO

(Photo, Bina Ceszynski)

The Central Library and Archive of YIVO was enriched with an important book and periodical collection. This book treasury that consists of approximately two thousand pieces was brought in by the Chicago cultural worker and publisher Moshe Ceszynski, in the name of his untimely deceased wife, Bina Ceszynski who for many years was devoted to the collection of seforim [religious books], books, periodical editions and also archive material.

The collection is strongest in its periodicals. There are such rare periodical editions as: Warsawer Yidishe Zeitung [Warsaw Yiddish Newspaper] 1767-8; Kol Mevaser [Voice of the People], 1869, Odessa; Wiener Yidisher Kikeriki [Viennese Jewish Cock-a-Doodle-Do] 1879; Hatzefira [The Siren] 1881, Warsaw; Hasoef [Zionist literary periodical], 1885 Warsaw; Familien Fraynd [Family Friend] (Dos Spektor [The Specter]), 1888; Yidishes Folks Blat [Jewish People's Paper], 1889, Petersburg; Der Yudishe Biblotek [The Jewish Library] (The I.L. Peretz) 1891; Di Neye Zeit [The New Times]; 1898; Der Yud [The Jew]; 1899, Krakow; Di Yudishe Familie [The Jewish Family], 1902, Krakow; Dos Yudishe Folk [The Jewish People], 1906, Vilna; and many others.

There were also a considerable number of important examples, such as Ben Zav's Oytser haShishim [The Sixty Treasures], 1817; Chaim Zelig Slonimski's writings, 1866; Lipshitse's Russian-Yiddish Dictionary, 1869; Tiferes Yisroel [Splendid Yisroel], (Yiddish), 1883, Odessa; Presberger print of Glickel of Hamelin's Memoirs, 1836; an old printing of Guide to the Perplexed in Hebrew and another in Yiddish and so on.

In addition, there is also a collection of art books and books about art.

It can be seen from the collection that the Ceszynskis devoted themselves to collecting according to a clear plan and, therefore, the collection is of great importance. They succeeded in amassing a fine collection of Soviet publications that is now difficult to obtain.

The management of the Central Library is now busy making a list and preparing a catalogue of the book treasures. All of the Ceszynski books are together in a special place.

Together with the seforim [religious books] and archive that was just recently brought over from Frankfurt – YIVO's Central Library and Archive was newly enriched, both with books and with archival material.

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