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“Generation after generation will pass …
and no one will remain to remember us and our forefathers …” (cont.)

 




Here lie 8,000 Jews
From Zarasai and its environs
Murderously slaughtered by
the German fascists
On August 26, 1941






 
The Monument with the Original Inscription, 1947

 

 




Here in this place
The Nazi-murderers
And their collaborators
Barbarously slew
8,000 Jews – children, women and men
Sacred be the memory
Of the innocent victims





 
The Monument with the New Inscription, 1991

 

“We remember…”
 
The Second and Third Generations visit the Mass Graves, August 2007
Right side, top: Arthur Aires, Shimshon Zimmerman, Dani and David Toker
In front: Yonatan Mandel, Sara Weiss (Slep), sisters Mehlman: Shlomit Steinitz and Michal Vidan, RamaRefael (Mandel) in front
Left side, top: Dov Stern and Ruti (Sterman), Aviram and his father Moshe Sterman, Orly Ben-Moshe (Mandel) between Rami and his father Reuven Milon
In front: Leuma and Gidon Lerman, Uri Mandel (kneeling)
[Courtesy of Ruti Stern]

 

The Jews of Lithuania were settled in over two hundred shtetlach, scattered throughout the country. There was almost no urban center or village in which there were no Jews living. Sometimes there were only isolated families.

The war between Germany and the Soviet Union began on June 22, 1941. Like fire carried on a raging wind, destruction and murder settled on the Jewish communities, and before a year had passed, in all the outlying towns of Lithuania (outside of Kovno [Kaunas] and Shavli [Siauliai]), all that remained of the Jews were communal graves. When the storm passed, the war ended and the few survivors came out of the dens in which they had hidden, the soldiers and partisans returned from battle, the remnants of the camp inmates were liberated, and the people who had found sanctuary in the Soviet Union began returning “home”, then the destruction of Lithuanian Jewry was revealed in all its atrocity.[3]

Footnote

  1. [46] Barak, Zvi. Arey Hasadeh [Shtetlach], in Yahadut Lita, Volume 4, p. 235.

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