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ViewMate Posting VM 91202

Submitted by Rachelle Ann Litt

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Information Picture Question
Category: Translation - Tombstone
Approval Date: 2/21/2021 2:59 PM
Family Surname: Krant
Country: Canada
Date of Image: 2004
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Looking for Tombstone translation please.

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On  Response 
2/21/2021 4:00 PM Here lies

MIRIAM

daughter of Reb Chaya and Shimon

She passed away 18 Adar 5764

May her soul be bound up in the bond of life.
===================================================
This stone is a bit unusual, in that it names both her mother and her father. The word 'Reb' -- which is an honorific and does not mean rabbi -- usually applies only to men. More correct might have been to write "daughter of Chaya and Reb Shimon".

The 18th of Adar of the year 5764 began at sunset on March 10th, 2004, and ended at sunset on the 11th. As the secular date on the stone is the 10th, this means that she died between sunset and midnight of that day.

She is described as having been a Yiddish poet, and there are a few lines of Yiddish at the bottom. I am not an expert in Yiddish, but I believe that this is the translation:

Take the pen into the hand
And dip it into love.
[in smaller letters:] My Garden

The two lines rhyme in the Yiddish. Perhaps "My Garden" is the name of the poem.
2/21/2021 5:27 PM Hello Rachelle,

Regarding the use of the word "Reb".....In agreement and as indicated by the person who responded previously, the word "Reb" is used as a title of respect preceding the given name of a Jewish male. Linguistically it is a word with a male gender ID, so it would NOT be used to identify a female person or noun.

Also...it is very unlikely that the mother of someone born in 1908 would have been a rabbi in the 1800s.

It's also very interesting that this tombstone was covered in three languages, so apparently Yiddish was an important expression of her thoughts and impressions during her lifetime. This is borne out by the acknowledgment that she was a Yiddish poet....Jo

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