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ViewMate Posting VM 88827

Submitted by Gary Blumsohn

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Information Picture Question
Category: Translation - German
Approval Date: 12/2/2020 2:43 PM
Family Surname: Israelit/Blumson
Country: Germany
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This document is about an inmate of the Stutthof concentration camp. Based on prior knowledge and with the help of Google Translate, I've managed to figure out most of this. The items I'm struggling with are:
1) 5th line of the form, right hand side: "Stand" and then an answer that I can't read. What does Stand mean and what is the answer?
2) 6th line: Father's name (died 1937) and then mother's name (Seine Bar) and then something I can't read. What is that last word?
3) About half way down, on the right hand side, it says Zahne, which I believe means "teeth." What is the written answer to that? (My understanding is that all her teeth were extracted before the war.)
4) About 3/4 way down: "Einweisende Dienststelle." Google said that meant "Instructing Department." The answer is Sipo Kauen. Kauen = Kovno (I know she was sent to Stutthof from the Kovno Ghetto), but what is Sipo?

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On  Response 
12/2/2020 8:28 PM Stand: geschieden = [marital] status: divorced
unbek[annt] = unknown
Zähne; lückenhaft = teeth: full of gaps
einweisende Behörde = government agency that sent the individual [to Stutthof]
Sipo, acronym for Sicherheitspolizei = security police
see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sicherheitspolizei

12/3/2020 4:48 PM "Seine Bar" is unlikely to be her mother's name. "Seine" is the third person singular possessive pronoun; I can't imagine anyone naming their daughter His, Her or Its. I would guess it's part of a phrase ending in "unbek" (for "unbekannt," "unknown"), which would translate to English as "his bar unknown," unless the German "Bar" is also an abbreviation rather than the equivalent of the English "bar." The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum's glossary of German terms and abbreviations (https://secure.ushmm.org/individual-research//Glossary.pdf) lists "Bar" as an abbreviation for "Barak" ("barrack" in English), usually followed by a number. Perhaps someone who knows more German than I do can come up with a better translation/explanation.
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