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ViewMate Posting VM 63301

Submitted by Henry Wellisch

Information Picture Question
Category: Translation - German
Approval Date: 12/27/2017 5:18 PM
Family Surname: WELLISCH
Country: Hungary
Town: Ragendorf
Date of Image: 1782
Click the picture to enlarge

This is part of the 1st page of a list of Jewish inhabitants of the small Hungarian town of Ragendorf(now Rajka) in north western Hungary, where Jews there were German speaking. My family named WELLISCH comes from there and the 1st time this name of appeared there (spelled VELISCH) was in a 1753 tax list. No Wellisch between this and the enclosed document from 1782. I am most interested in the names of the 1st two entries. Could the name of these 2 people be WELLESCH or something similar? Please note that the letter W in "Weiber Nahme" and Weiblich Kinder" looks similar. I am not sure about the last letter. The next time the name Wellisch appears is in a Ragendorf tax list of 1792, where the name is spelled VELSCH. Only about 1846 do they use the current spelling of WELLISCH

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On  Response 
12/27/2017 8:50 PM "Wollest"
12/29/2017 1:40 AM I would suggest Wolleff, which could be a version of
the common name Wolf. I any case not connected to Wellisch.
12/29/2017 2:00 AM I also read it as Wolleff (=Wolf), and it appears to be the given name of the two men, not their family names.
12/29/2017 7:32 AM Wollrist

The given name seems to be Friedl, and in that name I see the same 'r'.
Also, the name is repeated below, and there is a dot over something like an 'i'. I think the writer forgot to dot his 'i' in the first entry.
12/29/2017 8:51 AM I see why you come up with that solution. The two f are written strange. But as in Dorff above it is meant to be "ff" and not a "st". Compare the "st" at "Esterl" underneath. So I go for Woll_ff.
But I admit, that this writer has a handwriting were it is easy to be read (after some more re-writings)
as something like Wollesch. That would be a possibility.
Without doubt it is the surname in both cases.
The first was "Branntweinbrener" alcohol distiller, I can not make out his first name. The second Salman/Salmon has a Gewölb. (Which could refer to the kind of storage room or stone house he had.)
12/29/2017 9:39 AM This is the typical handwriting of the 18th century. There were two sorts of -e-. In the first name we have to read Wolleff. We have the 2nd type 2 lines later in "Wein". The double ff is also typical. The -r- was always a so-called split character:2 vertical lines connected at the bottom: cf. near the end "Hirtz".
The final -ff is totally clear and can not be read as "sch". Cf. "Herschl" at the right hand bottom corner. I am so sure, because I, as a historian, have read thousands of such pages.
Is it possible that these 2 names do not belong together? Menk writes in his dictionary that all the variations of Wellsch are "denoting someone coming from a Romance Country".
(G.Buck)
12/29/2017 9:41 AM I also read (or rather piece together) Wolleff or Walleff: ff as in dorff, o as in Lobl or a as in Nahme, e as in Nahme.
12/29/2017 1:49 PM It seems to be a Gewölb with Weizzen, ie a store of wheat. I'm reading the name as Wollest, or even Vollest because the capital letter isn't as full as the W in Wein and Weizzen.. I think the crossbar is for the second letter only, making it a t. Vollesr is a more pronounceable name, so more likely. And the first name of the first man could be Stöneger or Stäneger. The 4-year-old child is called Gerstol,

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