“Vendersheim”
Encyclopaedia of Jewish Communities:
Germany volume 3
(Germany)

49°52' / 08°04'

Translation from Pinkas ha-kehilot Germanyah

Published by Yad Vashem

Published in Jerusalem, 1992


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Acknowledgments

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This is a translation from: Pinkas Hakehillot: Encyclopaedia of Jewish Communities, Germany
Volume 3, page 279, published by Yad Vashem, Jerusalem, 1992


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[Page 279]

Vendersheim, Germany

A village in the Alzey- Worms district, today in the state of Rheinland-Pfalz.

by Yaacov Lozowick

 

Population

YearPopulationJews%
1828 49 
1861494377.5
1880509387.5
191048261.2
192543461.4
193345661.3

Religious Affiliation by % in 1933

JewsCatholicsProtestantsOthers
1.337.561.2 --

In the 19th century a small Jewish community existed in Vendersheim (in 1828, 49 persons), which had a synagogue. At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, the number of Jews decreased steadily and the community was on the brink of dismantling. At this time kosher slaughter still was carried out. The community belonged to the Alzey rabbinate. In 1935 Max Berger, the last head of the community, sold the synagogue.

In the years 1937/8 all Jews left Vendersheim. A family of three persons immigrated to the USA and a second family of four persons moved to Mainz.


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