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Professor Kurt E. Shuler

"... I hope that you can focus this exhibition primarily on the success of the emigrants in overcoming the difficulties they faced in leaving their homes and adjusting to a new and different world. It would be useful to point out at the same time that these achievements could equally well have benefited Germany if it were not for the insane and murderous racial policy of the Nazis."
From a letter of Prof. em. Kurt E. Shuler, September 16, 1998 (NCA files 412-25-01/1)

 

Kurt E. Schulherr in the late 1930s

Kurt E. Schulherr in the late 1930s

Kurt E. Shuler (Schulherr) was born in Nuremberg July 10, 1922. In 1937 he emigrated with his parents to the U.S. and became an American citizen in 1944. After receiving his bachelor' s degree in 1942 Shuler served with U.S. Army 1944 until 1946. As a military intelligence officer he returned to Nuremberg in 1945 and took part in the war crimes tribunal. Discharged from the military he resumed his academic career: Ph.D. (1949), postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins University (1949-1951), promotion to senior staff member and assistant at Applied Physics Laboratories (1951-1955). 1955-1961 he worked at the National Bureau of Standards and finally was promoted to assistant director. Having held high rank positions at General Motors and the Institute for Defense Analyses Kurt Shuler became professor of chemistry at the University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, 1968-1991. Twice he was elected chairman of the department. Shuler authored and edited many scientific publications and was honored with the Distinguished Service Award of the National Bureau of Standards and the Gold Medal Award of the Department of Commerce. Several invitations to submit proposals for the Nobel prize for Chemistry show his scientific reputation.

 

Immigration visa from Kurt Schulherr's passport

Immigration visa from Kurt Schulherr's passport

"... I should tell you that I have no problem associating with the younger generation in Germany - I have had a number of German 'Post-Docs' and have lectured at a number of German Universities but I am very uncomfortable with Germans of my age group since I have no way of telling what they did (or did not do) during the Nazi period."

Prof. em. Kurt E. Shuler, February 1997

 

Professor Shuler in the 1960s

Professor Shuler in the 1960s

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