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[Page 279]

Dwellers from outside the Land of Israel

"..." after text means that certain more current information has been kept out for privacy reasons

Fichell Igelman
Simcha Zalman Altman
Chaim Baumgarten
Fichell Bornstein (Stone)
Avrohom (Abe) Kutovitz
Yosseph Kutovitz
Aron Goldfarb
Yaakov (Jack) Goldfarb
Hillel Igielman
Shalom Weintraub
Zanvil Weintraub
Hershel Weisbroid
Pinchas Wintrov
Hershel Tepper
Aron Tennbaum
Avraham Nathan Lieberman
Yonoh Studenk
Eli Leibson
Liebel Landstein
Pauler (Pearl) Flantzbaum (Nee Lerman)
Mayer Polker
Avraham Polkier
Mordechai Farshtendig
Paulter Friedman
Yoseph Tzimbelista
Golda Kochman (nee Cohen)
Shmuel Yitzchok Cygelman
Shraga Kipper
Paula Cooper
Shlomo Kligerman
Kopel Kendal
Leible Sherman
Sheindle Rozenberg (Nee Rachman)
Meir Sherman
Yoseph Sherman

Fichell Igelman

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father David and my mother Frumet. I had four brothers and sisters; Moshe Lieb, Binyamin, Devorah, and Pearl. In 1942 my family together with most of the Jews of Biyalabgige were deported to Treblinka were they were all exterminated by the cursed Nazis - May Hashem Avenge Their Blood. I was the only survivor and I went through many concentration camps; Chainstechowe, Sarkizowe, Kamminer, and Buchinwald. I was liberated by the U.S. Forces, in Checkslovakia. I then left to the USA... I am very pleased to see that a book of Biyalabgige is being published which will be an everlasting memorial to out Town, Biyalabgige.

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Simcha Zalman Altman

I was born in Bialobrzeg, the son of Reb Binyomin son of R. Moishe Chaim and Esther daughter of Reb Moishe Yosef. I was one of three children, Chaim Zelig was in Russia resides today in America. My sister Ruchoma and I were sent to a concentration camp and after our liberation emigrated to America. Ruchoma passed away in 1977... I hope and pray that our children will never have to go through what we endured and will live in peace and harmony.

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Chaim Baumgarten

I was born in Biyalabgige in 1913 to my father Yitzchok and my mtoerh Chaya. We were family of eight children. My brother Simcha Meyer, and my sisters; Baila Gradel, Miriam, Malka, Frumet, Yochved, and Dinah. In 1932 I went to France to my sister Miriam who was already living there. I stayed there until my fathers illness in 1934 when I then returned to Biyalabgige. In 1936 I was conscripted to the Polish army. In 1938 my mother passed away. I returned to Paris straight after the Shiva period. During the war my brother and my sisters; Miriam, Frumet and Yochaved were murdered by the Nazis. My sister Malka (Feldman) presently lives in Paris next to me. My other surviving sister Dinah lives in Tel Aviv. During the war years I was sent from camp to camp. In 1946 I emigrated to the USA where I was once again united with my brother Simcha. In the USA I met my wife Chaya Etika (nee Eckstein) who is also from Biyalabgige... Her parents were called Yisrael and Chava Esther. My wife had a brother called Shmuel David who also perished in the Holocaust. She has another vrother Velvele who emigrated to the USA in 1925...

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Fichell Bornstein (Stone)

I was born in Bialobrzeg in 1923. My father was called Yitzchok Noter and my mother, Gittel the daughter of Avraham Birenbaum. My oldest sister was called Miriam who was married to Avraham Zaltzhendler when the War broke out. Both were killed in Branawer in 1941, my sister being only 29 years old. My G-d avenge their Blood. My second sister Fiegi was also killed in Branewer in 1941, she was 22 years old. My brother Simcha was married to Surela Rabinowitz. He passed away in USA in 1961 at the young age of only 42 years old. As I write these lines I recall my dear family who were so mercilessly massacred in the Holocaust, I do so with pain and sadness and may G-d avenge their Blood.

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Avrohom (Abe) Kutovitz

I was born in Byalibgige to my father Lieble and my Mother Pesia, I had three brothers and one sister: Shlomo, Yisroel, Yoseph, Binyamin and Esther. In 1942 the Nazis expatriated myself and my two brothers, Yisroel and Yoseph to "Skarzisko Kamieno" where we slaved in an ammunition factory. We were then sent to Chernstichowe, where we also worked at an ammunition factory. We worked on night shift and it was extremely arduous. From there we were transported to Buchenwald. Yisroel and myself were liberated on 11-4-45. My brothers Yoseph and Binyamine were liberated by the Russians, four months before us. Yisroel and I were hospitalized for six months, and when my brother Yoseph and Binyamin found out that we survived and of our whereabouts they came to us and we were once again united. We were all wed in one evening on one ceremonly in Landsburge, Germany.

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Yosseph Kutovitz

I was born in Byalibgige to my father Yehuda and my Mother Pesia, I had three brothers and one sister: Shlomo, Yisroel, Yoseph, Binyamin and Esther. In 1942 to my depp regret we were separated from my parents and the rest of my family, who were all exterminated in Treblinka - May G-d Avenge Their Blood. Only my two brothers Yisrael, Avraham and myself survived and after our liberation we emigrated to the USA... May we hear only good tidings.

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Aron Goldfarb

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Moshe and my mother Sara. My father was the son of Rabbi Chaim Dov Goldfarb of Wurkeah. My mother was the daughter of Reb. Liebke Chaider. We were a fmily of nine children. During the First World War two small children passed away; Chaim Dov and Chayia, which left us with seven children; The oldest was called Esther, after which came Yitzchok, Avraham, Yaakov, Myself, Bracha and the youngest Shimon, who was named after the Grand Rabbit of Skernowitz Zal. My father was an ardent Chassid of the Rebbe of Skernowitz. In 1930 my mother passed away, and left seven orphans, and my oldest sister Esther became our surrogate mother. My father Reb Moshe Zal. worked very hard and eked out his living as a Melamed (Hebrew teacher) at the local Chaider. When the Nazis started to send us to forced labor, I was amonth the first transport which was sent to the billage of Schucher not far from Biyalabgige. It was there I begame to hear terrible stories of the atrocities that were taking place to our Jewish brethren but at that stage I still found it difficult to believe. The officer in charge was acertain "Hauptstrumfurer" Rozach, and his deputy was caled Schmidt Shtekel and another cruel Nazi called Otto. We worked six days a week hard labor. The Judenrite arragned that there should be an equal recruitment from all families alike, but the more affluent families bribed themself out of the conscription, and others had to go instead. After the deportation in 1942 my brothers Avraham and Yitzchok and myself remained in Sucher. From there we were went to Radom and to another labor camp called Pieunki. We worked there in an ammunition factory together with other friends from Biyalabgige. The work was extremely strenuous, and the conditions were atrocious. News began to filter in that a few members of our family are hiding in Poland. In August 1944 the three of us escaped together with other friends from Pieunki. During the getaway I lost my brother Yitzchok and friend called Zissman Birman. We then decided to return to Sucher, hoping that we would find remaining members of the family. We dug a bunker which resembled more like a grave. The hardships that we endured is indescribable. We were located in close proximity to the battalions of the famous German General Schtoube. We remained there until out liberation on 12-1-45. Our first thought was to return to Biyalabgige in order to try and find any remaining members of the family. We were soon joined by other survivors, each one of us had so much to tell of his travails. Shortly after our return to Biyalabgige the Poles showed great hostility towards us. At that period the pogrom at Klotzer took place were 50 Jews, Holocaust survivors, were brutally massacred by the Poles. We therefore decided to leave for Germany. We arrived to a town called Amperthaim, which was then under American occupation. From there we emigrated to the USA where we were once again united with our brother Yaacov, who arrived through Russia. It always pained me greatly that my brother Yitzchok was not given a Jewish burial. In 1973 I traveled back to Poland, and with the help of a certain Polish family and the help of the American Ambassador in Warsaw we traced borth the grave of my brother Yitzchok and of Zissman Birman and we reburied them at the Chulon cemetery in Israel... I am very pleased to see that a book of Biyalabgige is being published which will be an everlasting memorial to our Town, Biyalabgige, and may we never again undergo any suffering.

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Yaakov (Jack) Goldfarb

About my family my brother Aaron has already written I will therefore write about myself. I left for Warsaw before the War in order to work and provide support for our family. It is difficult to describe how hard it was for us to elk out a living. When the Nazis invaded Warsaw I fled to Brisk, and then I moved from town to town. Whenever we heard the slightest rumor the Germans were closing in, I immediately was once again on the run. On the way I met two communists from Biyalabgige; Yitzchok Reich and Simcha Blendever. We then fled together to Odessa and when the Nazis invaded Russia in 1941 at Stalingrad I went to work for the Red Army. I was released in 1948 and then returned to Poland where I met my wife Malkah...

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Hillel Igielman

I was born in Byalobzegy in 1929 to my parents: Ficshel and Brucha. My four brothers, Phinchas, David, Srulick, and Yankle, and my two sisters, Necha and Shiener perished in the terrible Holocaust, May G-d Avenge their Blood. In 1941 I was taken to work in an ammunition factory in the city of Radom. After a short period I was then transported from Camp to Camp and I was even taken to Auschwitz. I was liberated from Dachau on the last day of the War...

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Shalom Weintraub

I was born in Bialobrzegi to my parents; Yaacov and Sara Elkah. My Father passed away in his prime in the year 1920, and left my Mother a widow and my brother Zanvill and myself orphans. We had a very large family living in Bialobrzegi, uncles, aunts and many cousins, all tragically perished at the hand of the cursed Nazis, May Hashem Avenge Their Blood. I remember my uncle, Yoseph Laizer (my mother's brother), his wife Feigi, and their children, Yisroel, Chaim, Sarah, Chanah Pearl, and many more of my family, who were all so brutally butchered by the Nazis. May Hashem Avenge Their Blood. Despite those horrifying years of war and persecution we endured, we managed with great miracles to survive, and reach the United States where we rebuilt our lives afresh... It gives me very great pleasure and satisfaction to see that at long last a book is being published on my beloved town, Bialobrzegi.

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Zanvil Weintraub

I was born in Bialobrzegi to my parents; Yaacov and Sara Elkah. My Father passed away in his prime, and left my Mother to look after me and my brother, Shalom. As my brother Shalom already described, our large family perished in teh Holocaust, May Hashem avenge Their Blood. I managed to survive together with my brother Shalom, despite the great suffering we endured in the many concentration camps we went through during the six years of the War. After our liberation I emigrated to Cleavland in the USA... I am in deep gratitude to all my friends in Israel, who assisted in publishing this book, so that our future generations will always remember and cherish our birthplace, the Town of Bialobrzegi.

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Hershel Weisbroid

I was born in Byalabgegi to my father, Zeissman and to my mother, Fraidah. I had a brother Daniel and a sister, Baila Mindel. My entire family lived in Byalabgegi including my granparents (from my father's side), Baruch and Blumah. We were a most happy family. My father had a textile shop, and we lived in an apartment in the shop. Im my youth I learned Hebrew studies with a "Rebbe" like the rest of the children of my age. On the fateful day of the deportation of all the Jews from Byalabgegi, the cursed Nazis shot and killed my Father and my Sister. The rest of my family were taken to Treblinka where they were all murdered, May G-d Avenge Their Blood. I was sent first to Skunzisk and then to Chenstochowa, Buchenwald, and Moiselwitz. After my liberation I lived for a short period in Germany, and then emigrated to the United States... I wish the generations to come, theat they should enjoy a happy and prosperous life, but most importantly, that our offspring should always remember their roots.

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Pinchas Wintrov

I was born in Bialobrzeg, the son of Reb Yehuda Arye. I was in the Bialobrzeg Ghetto when the war broke out and was there until 1942. My family was then sent to a concentration camp, I was transported around various camps until 1945; and after liberation lived in Germany until 1947. I then emigrated to the US...

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Hershel Tepper

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Reb Moshe the son of Reb Shalom and my mother Chanah the daughter of Reb Yitzchok Aiyzik. My brothers were called Yitzchok, Shalom, and Yehuda and I had a sister called Dinah. They all perished in the terrible Holocaust in the death camp Treblinka - May Hashem Avenge Their Blood. After the War I emigrated to the USA...

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Aron Tennbaum

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Reb Leibish and my mother Martel. My two sisters were called Chiaya and Sara. My brothers were called Yaakov, Yisrael, Moshe, Piniya, and Mendle. Our lives were similar to the rest of the Jews in Biyalabgige, we did not lead and affluent life but we were a large and happy family. All my family perished in the horrifying Holocaust - only myself and my brother Mendle (who resides in Israel) survived... I am very pleased to see that a book of Biyalabgige is being published which will serve as a study book for our offspring and will also be an everlasting memorial to our Town, Biyalabgige.

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Avraham Nathan Lieberman

I was born in Biyalabgige in the year 1905 to my parents Yisrael and Freide (Nee Kopper). We had a very large family all of whom, to my greatest sorrow, perished in the dreadful Holocaust. My mother had many brothers and sisters. She had a sister called Esther Feiga who married to Itzer Landstein, their daughter; Hadassa chanah and her husband, their son Mendle and his wife Zlater and their children. Another sister Sara Tamma married Eliezer Sherman. Their children were Esther Rivka and her husband from Warsaw, their daughter married to Israel Rozentwieg. Another son was called Meir. My mother's other sister was called Channa Leah who was married to Moshe Arron Waldenberg and they had a son called Hersh Nathan. My mother's brother was called Lemil Kooper, his wife Sima, their daughter Pearl Zlader married Yonoson Lewin from Warsaw. Lemil had more children Rechavia, Yechiel, Shlomo, Nathan and his wife Jenny Nakowski. My mother's other brother David and his wife Chavah, their son Yaakov Hirsh, their daughter Brindel, and Eta. My mother's youngest brother was called Yechiel Meir his son was called Shlomo Nathan. My father had on e brother Efraim who married Chanala and together with their son Moshe all were killed by the Nazis. My parents had six children - Esther, Channa, Yocheved, Brindel, Yuter, and my only brother Moshe. My sister Esther was married to Hersh Yoseph Rozenbich, they had three children - Lieble, Yisrael, and Nathan. My sister Chana was married to Yossel Bien and they also had two children Pearler and Yisrael. My sister Yochaved was married and had two children Yisrael and Avraham. Breingdel was married to Mottele Rozenberg, and my brother Moshe married Shifra Birnbaus, and were murdered together with their five year old son, Yisrael. My father was a great Torah scholar who was born in Skernawitz, and his father Reb Yechiel was a very famous Chassid. My mother was the daughter of the Dayan Reb Avraham Bornstein, who was also a very renowned Talmid Chacham. My father passed away very young at the age of 48 and my mother was left a widow with 6 children with myself being the oldest. In 1930 I married to my wife Yocheved Baumgarten. In 1942 our only daughter Bisya was born to us, and we brought her up with great joy and tender loving care. I have with me many wonderful memories which I cherish to this day of our life in Biyalabgige from the years 1918-1930 when I was very active in the Zionist Youth Movement in out town. Also I have many memories of the pre-War era in Biyalabgige ie the years 1930-1939 where the atmosphere was already highly explosive and we felt the war tide rapidly blowing in from Nazi Germany. Of course we never envisaned in our wildest dreams of what was really to take place. During the War I lost my dear wife Yocheved who was killed on 28/6/43 in Staninislaw together with three other Jews from Biyalabgige - Yaakove Leib Shustach and his two brothers, and Yossef Yom Tov Sherman. I remained alone with only my surviving daughter, Bisya. After the War I emigrated to Paris...

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Yonoh Studenk

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Reb Mordchei and my mother Zlater. We were a large family. Their names were Dinah, Arron, Yisrael, Zeilig, Nechomo, Vellvel, and Avraham.

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Eli Leibson

I was born in Byalabgegi to my father, Yechezkel and to my mother, Rivkah (nee Birenbaum). We were five children at home, Mendle, Zecharia, Hersh Lieb, Berel, and myself. My father was a wealthy man before the War, he had a ice cream and soda factory, in addition to a restaurant. He was also a timber merchant. When the Nazis occupied Byalabgegi, they drove us out of our house and we went to live in Sodova Street, we suffered greatly together with the rest of the Jews in the town. In 1943 all the remaining Jews were deported to Treblinka where all my family perished, May G-d Avenge Their Blood. I was sent to Sucha where I was forced to do many kinds of difficult and strenuous labor. I was then deported to Ostrowicz and then to Auschwitz, where I spent one and a half years. I was then transported in an open train to Buchenwald, where I worked for three months in a forest. At Larger Dora in Nordhausen I was badly injured from a shot in my left leg. It was then amputated for "experimental" purposes with out anesthesia. I was liberated by the famous Colonel Hugh Cary who later became Governor of New York State. After my liberation I became Mayor of Gosiar Am Hartz, for a period of six months. In 1949 I emigrated to the USA...

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Liebel Landstein

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Reb Itchia and my mother Esther Fiega. We were a family of six at home. My oldest brother was called Moshe and next came Mendle after which came my sisters Hadass Channi and myself. My two youngest brothers were called Yehuda Aria and Henoch, respectively. Before the War we lived very affluently working for the local Squire - we lacked nothing. In 1942 my whole family was deported to Treblinka where they were exterminated - May G-d Avenge Their Blood. My brother Moshe and myself were the only survivors. My brother Moshe passed away in 1976. During the War I was in a camp called Sacrzsto Kimminer and later in Chanstichowe, I was liberated in 1945. I then returned to Biyalabgige where I lived for about half a year. I then went to live in Lodj also for half a year. I then moved to Germany where I met my wife Sara and we married.

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Pauler (Pearl) Flantzbaum (Nee Lerman)

I was born in Bialobrzegi to my parents Eliezer and Sarah Tamah, the daughter of Reb Yoseph Koper. Our family consisted of four brothers and two sisters - Rivka, Sheindle, Breindle Eta, Nathan, Yhoshua, and myself Pearl Hadassa. My mother came from a very large family. My grandfather Reb. Yoseph had about eighty children and grandchildren before the War, Alas very few remain alive today. My oldest sister Rivka married before the War, they lived in Warsaw, and they had one son. When the war broke out we wanted them to return to Bialobrzegi, because in Warsaw there was a terrible shortage of food and people were dying of starvation. She however did not want to leave her husband and they all perished in Treblinka, May G-d Avenge Their Blood. When the deportations started in Bialobrzegi we were given one small room for the whole family, it was extremely difficult. My brother Yhoshua married in the ghetto to Pessia the daughter of Arron Goldberg also from Bialbrzegi. I worked very hard to earn a living for our family. I remember when the Nazis shaved off my father's beard. We cried so much, but my father calmed us and explained to us that the most important thing is to fight for survival. Once a few young Germans knocked on the door and shouted that we should call our father. I started to cry in front of them and told them that I had no one left in the world except my old father and pleaded that they leave him alone. They left and went to our neighbor Leible Blechash instead. They forced him out of the house and killed him on the spot. In 1942 the Nazis gathered all the Jews into the "horse market", and many were killed on that day, including my father. May G-d Avenge Their Blood. The rest of my family were deported to Treblinka where they all perished. May G-d Avenge Their Blood. My brother and sister in law remained a little longer in Bialobrzegi. From Bialobrzegi I was taken to Sacrzshuska, and from there to many other labor camps, among them Auschwitz, from there we were sent to Hindenburg, and from their to Bergen Belzen. It was there that I understood the real meaning of "Hell". It was also from there that I was finally liberated. After my liberation I simply did not know where to turn, when suddenly I met my brother and sister in law, Yhoshua and Pessia. In 1948 I married my husband Chaim (Flanzbaum) and we emigrated to the US... It is of greates importance that our future generations should remember the great suffering of our people which tood place in one of history's darkest eras. Since this is the object of this book, I am therefore deeply indebted to you.

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Mayer Polker

I was born in Byalabgegi to my father, Yechiel and to my mother, Chaya. My real name is Mayer but I am often referred to as David. I had five brothers - Yaacov, Mayer, Chaim, Shulom and Abe (Avraham). Out of all my very large family, only myself and my brother Abe survived. We were together in a concentration camp in Radom, and we were liberated from the notorious death camp Dachau in 1945. After my liberation I emigrated to the US...

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Avraham Polkier

I was born in Bialobrzegi to my parents Yechezkel and Chayah. We led a peaceful and happy life until the War broke out. During the war years I was expatriated from one camp to another. I was in Auschwitz and in Dachau. I was liberated by the American forces in April 1945... I always tried to keep in contact with survivors of Bialobrzegi both in the United States and in Istrael where we visited very often. I always thought how important it is to publish a book on our town and to record all that transpired in our birthplace, Bialobrzegi, so that our future generations will always remember the dreadful Holocaust, the fine era preceding it, and most important of all, how we managed to survive and rebuild once again our family, only this time in the Holy Land.

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Mordechai Farshtendig

I was born in Bialobrzeg, the son of Reb Meir. I was one of five children, a sister Devorah and brothers Simcha, Itzza and Mendel. My sister Devorah married a young man called Meir Langman and they lived together in Apla. They had a son called Yankele, who was only two months old at the outbreak of the war. As the war took hold I wanted to know the well-being of my sister and her child so I traveled two days on foot to Apla, where I found her and her family alive and well. I wanted to return to my family in Bialobrzeg but my brother in law refused to let me return as the road back to Bialobrzeg was extremely perilous at that time. I waited until a whole group of fellow Jews wanted to return to Bialobrzeg and I joined with them. That was the last time I saw my sister and her child, may Hashem Avenge Their Blood. My parents and my brother Simcha perished in the notorious death camp Treblinka, my brother Izza died at that time from illness and my other brother Mendel was killed by a Ukrainian in a concentration camp. Their images constantly appear before my eyes from the termination of that horrific War until today.

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Paulter Friedman

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Fievel and my mother Rivkah. We were a family of four children, Itzah, Moshe, Rachel, and myself. My whole family was annihilated in the Holocaust and I was the only survivor...

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Yoseph Tzimbelista

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Reb Yaacov and my mother Yenta. I had three sisters - Rivkah, Pessia and Henia, and brother Elchonon. My father founded an interest free loan fund and many benefitted greatly from it. He passed away in 1938 after an illness. I was together with my family until 1942 when all of the Jews of Biyalabgige were deported to Treblinka. All of my dear family perished at Treblinka, May Hashem Avenge Their Blood. I was deported to a labor camp in Radom where I was together with many friends from Biyalabgige. In 1944, I was sent to Germany to a labor camp in Hanover, where I stayed until April 1945 when I was liberated by the French forces... I am very pleased to see that a book of Biyalabgige is being published which will be an everlasting memorial to our town, Biyalabgige.

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Golda Kochman (nee Cohen)

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Yechiel and my mother Chava Cohen. We were a family of seven children, four sisters (including myself) and three brothers. My sisters - Rivkele, Sara, Miriam and myself, Golda. My brothers - Shloime, Meyer, and Avromileh. In 1942 my dear family were taken to Treblinka where they all were martyred, May G-d Avenge Their Blood. Only my brother Shloime and myself managed to survive and we are currently close to each other in Canada. During the War I worked in a number of Concentration Camps such as Pinky, Auschwitz, and Bergen Belzen. I was liberated in 1945... I send my warmest greetings and blessings to those who have taken the innovation to publish this book, which will duly serve as an everlasting memorial of my beloved town, Biyalabgige.

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Shmuel Yitzchok Cygelman

I was born in Byaloibygi on 25/7/1928 to my parents Hershel and Chava. I had three brothers Zev, Mayer and Jonah, and one sister Rachel. We had a large family of many uncles, aunts and cousins all living in Byaloibyge. When the war broke out I was taken to perform forced labor for the cursed Nazis. In 1941 I was taken to the city of Radom to work in an ammunition factory where I stayed until 1943. I was then transported to Hungary where I was in various concentration camps such as Vyhingen, Hessentall, and Dachau. I was liberated in 1945 from Mittenwald Bavaria...

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Shraga Kipper

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Reb Moshe Ahron the son of Reb Yoseph and my mother Rachel the daughter of Reb Ahron. I had a brother called Yitzchok Nathan and a sister Rivkah, who were all exterminated in Treblinka, May Hashem Avenge Their Blood.

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Paula Cooper

I was born in Biyalabgige to my parents Yoseph and Rachel. We were a family of 11 children. My brothers were Lemal, Yechiel Meir, David, Menachem, and Pinchas. My sisters were Sara, Tarna, Esther Fiaga, Channa Lea, Freida, and myself. I left Biyalabgige before the War and went to live in Warsaw. It was while I was residing in Warsaw that the War broke out and was in the Warsaw Ghetto. It is very difficult for me to describe those unspeakable horrors which I as a young girl of only 14 years old went through together with the rest of the Jews of Warsaw. Every day literally thousands were transported to the nototious death camps of Auschwitz. My survival was a great miracle. From my very large family I was the only survivor. Apart from my immediate family, all my uncles and aunts including Shmuel, Rehnaia, Shlomo, Sara, Itzick, Nathan, Mamia, Beumi Cooper, Jonas and Irka Lewink, Chaim and Luba Leifeld. May the Lord Avenge Their Blood. After my liberation I went to live in Germany until 1951 when I then emigrated to the USA... I would like to give my blessing to my dear children and grandchildren, that they should read this book and understand what we went through in the terrible Holocaust, and may we know from now on only good.

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Shlomo Kligerman

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Reb Yoseph Zvi and to my mother Sara Rivkah. Besides myself we were a family of five. My brothers were Avrham Mordechei, and Yechiel Meir. My sisters were Esther Blima, Chanah Yocheved, and Tova. Before the War, we had a family in Biyalabgige of more than a hundred relatives, and to my greatest sorrow I am the only survivor. I went through a terrible time in those horrible war years. At the begining of the War in 1939 I was two years in Ghetto Biyalabgige. The Nazis massed all the Jews from the surrounding villagers in Biyalabgige, and the overcrowding was appalling. People were dying on the streets from hunger, and from time to time the Nazis would seize people from the streets for labor. In 1942 the whole Jewish population of Biyalabgige were deported to Treblinka, in sealed cattle trucks without any food or drink. The conditions were an undescribable nightmare. This is how they spent their last few days in this world because they were all brutally massacred in the notorious gas chambers on their arrival at Treblinka, May G-d Avenge Their Blood. I managed to avoid the transport by hiding on a polish farm approximately 6 km from Biyalabgige, from 1943 until January 1945. The farmer who gave me shelter was a very special person who together with his family risked their lives in order to save as many Jews as possible. The book which is currently being prepared for publishing will retell to the future generations all that transpired to the Jews from our beloved town Biyalabgige, that we remember our parents and family who perished at the hands of the cursed Nazis, remember all those who suffered so greatly in those darkest years that mankind ever went through. May we always remember our dearest and closest ones, May G-d Avenge Their Blood... I am currently married to Paula Cooper (see above)

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Kopel Kendal

I was born in Bialobrzegi on 7-3-1928 to my Father Shmuel Elya and to my Mother, Chana Devorah (Nee Kandelcukier). My Father was a very religious man who had an iron monger business, trading under various names. I had two Sisters, Chaya Liber and Esther Fiega. To the best of my knowledge they all perished in Treblinka. I had two uncles on my Mother's side, Hirsch Meir and Mailech Koper, who emigrated to Israel in 1936. I also had a number of cousins from my Mother's side. One cousin called Hersh Kreiger lived with us, married in 1938, and had one child. During the War I was deported from one concentration camp to another, including Treizenshtat and Buchenwald. I was liberated in 1945... It gives great satisfaction to see that a book is at long last being published on our dear Town Bialobrzegi.

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Leible Sherman

I was born in Bialobrzeg, the son of Reb Yitzchok and Chaya. I was one of six children, five brothers and a sister. My entire family perished in Treblinka in 1943. I was the only survivor. I was 16 years old when the War broke out and was sent to work in an ammunitions factory. After many years of suffering, I was liberated by the American Army. At that time I weighed just 30 kg and was near to the end. I settled with my family in Paris. I carry with me the memory of the Holocaust which devestated our people and my beloved family and I pray that such an atrocity will never befall our people again.

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Sheindle Rozenberg (Nee Rachman)

I was born in Bialobrzegi to my parents Simcha and Dinah (nee Karak). We were six children at home, Charner Esther, Pearl, Baila, Shmuel and myself, Sheindle. My father owned a butcher shop and we lived a happy and prosperous life. All this was until that fateful day when the cursed Nazis invaded Bialobrzegi. They shaved the beard off of my grandfather, Yankle, my mother's father. In 1942 the entire Jewish population was deported. I was sent to labor camps, where I was forced to work extremely hard until October 1944 when I was then deported to Auschwitz. It was there that I met my mother's youngest brother Eliezer. He was murdered in Auschwitz, May G-d Avenge His Blood. I was then sent to a labor camp in Germany, after which I was taken to Bergen Belzen. After my liberation at the end of the war, I entered a hospital where I stayed until I recuperated. I then went back to Bialobrzegi, but to my great disappointment, I found no trace of any remaining family. I left Bialobrzegi and went to Lodj where I found my mother's brother Yisroel who had joined the Partisans who fought the Nazis during the War from the forests. It was in Lodj where I met my husband...

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Meir Sherman

I was born in Bialobrzeg. My father was killed during the First World War, when I was a small child. I was one of twelve children, seven brothers and four sisters. Eight of my family perished during the Holocaust - my brothers Shlomo, Zelig, Pesach, Feivel and Beinish, and my sisters Frimet, Ba'ashe and Chava. The remaining four live in the United States...

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Yoseph Sherman

I was born in Biyalabgige to my father Shlomo and my mother Elita. We had five children in the family - my brothers Zeilig and Yudel and my sisters Zloder and Riezer. In 1942 my family were deported together with the rest of the Jews to Treblinka where they were exterminated. May G-d Avenge Their Blood. Only my brother Zeilig and myself were not deported to Treblinka and we spent those difficult war years together in labor camps. To my great sorrow my brother passed away in one of the labro camps at the end of the war. After my liberation I emigrated to the USA... It is a most important thing that a book of Biyalabgige is being published which will be an everylasting memorial to our Town, Biyalabgige.

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