JCR-UK

Provincial Jewry
in Victorian Britain

 

 

   
 


Extract from papers on
Provincial Jewry in Victorian Britain

Papers prepared by Dr. (later Prof.) Aubrey Newman for a conference at University College, London, convened on 6 July 1975 by the Jewish Historical Society of England
Reproduced here with Prof. Newman's kind consent)

Page created: 21 March 2017
Latest revision: 26 April 2017

        

STATISTICAL ACCOUNTS OF ALL THE
CONGREGATIONS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE
5606 / 1845

Transcribed by the late Rabbi Bernard Susser, B.A. M.Phil.

First Part
Results of General Questionnaire

Page 8

 

SOUTHAMPTON

SUNDERLAND

SWANSEA

YARMOUTH

 

KINGSTON, JAMAICA

NO. OF BAALAI BATIM:

10

5

9 resident
2 non-resident

-

 

120

NO. OF SEATHOLDERS:

7

None

13

-

115

NO OF INDIVIDUALS:

-

About 30

133

48

450

NO. OF PAID
OFFICERS:

J.A Goldman, Chazan, Shochet and Secretary.

None at present

Mr. Barnett, Chazan and Shochet;

H. Joseph, Shammas

M. Cohen, Shochet

Rev. S Jacobs, Chazan;

J. Joseph, Shammas, Shammas Gemilut Chasadim;

S. Myers, Secretary;

I. Abisdad, Shochet.

NO. OF SYNAGOGUES

1i

2ii.

1iii.

1iv.

Shaarei, Yosher and one of the Minhag Sephardim called Shaar Ha-Shamayim

ARE MITZVOT SOLD?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

IS THERE A MIKVEH?

No, the private baths of the town are used.

Yes

Yes

Sea  - baths

Yes

BURIAL GROUND

Nonev.

Yesvi.

Yesvii.

Yesviii.

Yes

CHARITABLE
INSTITUTIONS

None.

None

Zedakah LaAniyim

-

Chevrat Chinuch Yeladim, having a fund of 600 and is zapported by subscription and voluntary offerings in the Synagogue.
Chevrat Gemilut Chasadim for the burial of the poor, independent of which there are a number of persons who receive monthly donations from the Shool and Matzot at Pesach.

 

Webmaster's Notes (↵ returns to main text)

  1. Southampton's synagogue was then in East Street, Southampton since 1833. 

  2. The two Sunderland synagogue would have been the Adath Yeshurun, also known as the Israelite Congregation (the forerunner of the Sunderland Hebrew Congregation) and the Polish Synagogue in Vine Street . 

  3. Swansea's synagogue was then in Wateloo Street, from 1818 until 1859 . 

  4. The Yarmouth Synagogue was in Row 42 (situated off Market Place), known as Synagogue Row or Jews Row from. 1846/7 until 1877. 

  5. As noted in "Other Remarks" under Southampton in the Second Part of these Statistical Accounts: "By a recent act of Parliament for a public cemetery for the town to be taken from the public lands a portion has been set apart for the Jews, not to be consecrated..". 

  6. This refers to the Ayers Quay Cemetery, Sunderland's earliest known Jewish cemeteries, in use from about the 1770's until 1856. 

  7. This refers to Swansea's Old Jewish Cemetery, Townhill, established in 1768, the oldest Jewish burial ground in Wales. 

  8. This refers to Yarmouth's Old Jews' Burial Ground, Alma Road, in use from about 1801 to 1854. 

 

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