JCR-UK

Provincial Jewry
in Victorian Britain

 

 

   
 


Extract from papers on
Provincial Jewry in Victorian Britain

Papers prepared by Dr. (later Prof.) Aubrey Newman for a conference at University College, London, convened on 6 July 1975 by the Jewish Historical Society of England
Reproduced here with Prof. Newman's kind consent)

Page created: 13 March 2017
Latest revision: 7 May 2017

        

STATISTICAL ACCOUNTS OF ALL THE
CONGREGATIONS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE
5606 / 1845

Transcribed by the late Rabbi Bernard Susser, B.A. M.Phil.

First Part
Results of General Questionnaire

Page 4

i.

(KINGSTON-UPON-) HULL ii.

IPSWICH

JERSEY

LEEDS iii.

LIVERPOOL 

SEEL STREET CONGREGATION iv.

HARDMAN STREET NEW CONGREGATION v.

NO. OF BAALAI BATIM:

8

5

11

6

48

58, 12 not eligible for office

NO. OF SEATHOLDERS:

Only strangers during Yom Tov, the annual receipts from this source being 5.

3

5

-

131

12

NO OF INDIVIDUALS:

Total 65

Total 9

Total 47

Total 17

Total 15, or 1600 (sicvi)

91m. 49f. 184c. = 324 and 3 officers = 347

NO. OF PAID
OFFICERS:

S. Simons, Chazan and Shochet at a salary of 52 p.a.

Mr. Sternberg, Chazan and Shochet, removed to Montreal, Mr. Kalisch his substitute.

1 Shochet

Mr. D. Kaufman, Chazan, Shochet and Teacher at 14/-p.w.

Mr Oppenheim, Chazan,

D M Isaacs, Lecturer and Chazan Sheni,

M Woolf, Secretary

Raph Barnett, Shochet,

A. Abraham, Shomer Beth HaKevorot and Porsher,

H Aron, Shomer LaPetach u'Sheliach.

I Levy, Chazan, Shochet and Mohel.

M ZundelI, Shammas,

Mr Kelly, Porsher

NO. OF
SYNAGOGUES

1vii.

"Minyan"viii.

1ix.

"Minyan"x.

1xi.

1xii.

ARE MITZVOT SOLD?

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

?

IS THERE A MIKVEH?

Yes

?

The Sea

Yes

Yes

Yes

BURIAL GROUND

Yes, a freeholdxiii.

Yesxiv.

Yes, a free onexv.

Yesxvi.

Yesxvii., the Baalei Batim have the right of burial without charge. Seat holders are charged agreeably to a fixed scale as follows:

still born child 10/6;
under 2 yrs of age 1/1/-;
above 2 and under 7 1/11/6;
above 7 and under 16 2/12/6;
16 and upwards 3/13/6.

Yesxviii.

CHARITABLE
INSTITUTIONS

Philanthropic Society on the principle of a benefit society. The members pay a weekly subscription and receive relief in sickness and funeral donation.

-

-

None

Hebrew Philanthropic Institution for relief of the resident poor during the winter months supported by subcriptions and officers honorary.

Another is now in process of formation under 2 yrs of age L1/1/- for the suppression of mendicity and the more effectual relief of the deserving casual poor supported by both congregations.

Many members subscribe to Philanthropic Society.

Webmaster's Notes (↵ returns to main text)

  1. The congregation in Gloucester is not listed as "(t)here are no returns made for Gloucester". 

  2. The congregation in Hull subsequently became known as the Hull Old Hebrew Congregation. 

  3. The congregation in Leeds later became the Leeds Hebrew Congregation and subsequently the Leeds Great Synagogue. 

  4. This congregation in Liverpool was known as the Liverpool Hebrew Congregation and subsequently became the Liverpool Old Hebrew Congregation. 

  5. This was the the Liverpool New Hebrew Congregation, which seceded from the main congregation in 1842. 

  6. Both figures are clearly incorrect, possibly this should have read "150 or 160". 

  7. This is reference to the synagogue in Robinson Row, Hull, used by the congregation from 1826 to 1903. 

  8. Ipswich had a synagogue from 1795. 

  9. The Jersey congregation was founded in about 1843, and at the time of the questionnaire, services were probably held in a synagogue in the yard of 21 Grove Place, St Helier. 

  10. This, presumably, is reference to congregation (known as the "Bridge Street Minyan") that met in the converted loft in Bridge Street (at the bottom of Lady Lane), Leeds, until 1846. 

  11. This congregation used the synagogue in Seel Street until 1874, when it moved to Princes Road. 

  12. This congregation used the synagogue in Pilgrim Street / Hardman Street until 1857, when it moved to Hope Place. 

  13. This probably refers to Hull's Hessle Road Jewish Cemetery, in use from 1812 until 1858. 

  14. This refers to Ipswich's Salthouse Lane Jewish Burial Ground, acquired in about 1796 and in use until 1854. 

  15. This refers to older section of Westmont Jewish Cemetery, St Helier, acquired by the Jersey Jewish community in 1834. 

  16. This refers to the burial grounds on Gelderd Road, Gildersome (now part of the Leeds UHC Cemetery) opened in 1840. 

  17. At the time, the Seel Street Congregation appears to have had two functioning cemeteries: (i) The Upper Frederick Street Jewish Burial Ground, opened in 1789; and (ii) the Old Jews' Burial Ground at Dean Road, opened in 1838. 

  18. This refers to Liverpool's Green Lane Jewish Cemetery, apparently opened in 1839. 

 

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