JCR-UK

Provincial Jewry
in Victorian Britain

 

 

   
 


Extract from papers on
Provincial Jewry in Victorian Britain

Papers prepared by Dr. (later Prof.) Aubrey Newman for a conference at University College, London, convened on 6 July 1975 by the Jewish Historical Society of England
Reproduced here with Prof. Newman's kind consent)

Page created: 12 March 2017
Latest revision: 26 April 2017

        

STATISTICAL ACCOUNTS OF ALL THE
CONGREGATIONS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE i.
5606 / 1845

Transcribed by the late Rabbi Bernard Susser, B.A. M.Phil.

First Part
Results of General Questionnaire

Page 1

.

ii.

BATH

BIRMINGHAM
with its dependencies:
STOURBRIDGE, WALSALL, DUDLEY, WOLVERHAMPTON, WORCESTER, BURTON—ON—TRENT, LEAMINGTON

BRIGHTON.

BRISTOL

NO. OF BAALAI BATIM:

4

38iii.

16

36

NO. OF SEATHOLDERS:

5

99

32

40iv.

NO OF INDIVIDUALS:

15m.  12f.  23c. = 50

679

51m.  52f.  47c. = 150

about 150 exclusive of children

NO. OF PAID
OFFICERS:

1 Shochet and Chazan

Rev. Dr. Rapahel, Lecturer and Secretary;

Rev. L. Chapman, Chazan;

Rev. L. Levitus, Shochet;

P. Silverman, Shamma.

Moss B. Levy, Chazan and Ne'eman acts as Hebrew Teacher and Secretary;

Michael Simon Nuremberg, Shochet.

A.L. Green, Chazan;

Jos. Benjamin, Shammas and Shochet;

M. Aaron, Second Shammas.

NO. Of
SYNAGOGUES

1v.

1vi. and an auxiliary one in the Vestry during the High Festivals. 

German and Polishvii.

1viii.

ARE MITZVOT SOLD?

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

IS THERE A MIKVEH?

Yes. A natural bath

There is no regular Mikveh but extensive baths.

Yes

No, but in treaty for the purchase or rental of a piece of ground for erecting one.

BURIAL GROUND

1ix.

Yesx.

Yesxi.

One is private property, the other the freehold of the Kehillah.xii.

CHARITABLE
INSTITUTIONS

None

1. The Hebrew National School dispenses education gratuitously to the poor.xiii.

2. The Hebrew Philanthropic Society (Chevrat Meshivat Nefesh) affords relief to strangers as well as to residents.xiv.

3. The Benevolent Book & Clothing Society & Library founded and supported by the pupils of the School books and wit clothing and also to the pupils generally with instructive and entertaining books.

None, but the casual poor are relieved from Congregational funds.

1. Fund for relieving transit poor also for affording relief and annual assistance to several poor residents, and for other charitable.

2. A charitable society for the partial relief of resident poor lying in women, and educating a limited number of female children.

 

Webmaster's Notes (↵ returns to main text)

  1. Although these Statistical Acoounts refer to "all the Congregations of the British Empire", the only congregations included outside the British Isles were congregations in Kingston, Jamaica. 

  2. The link in the first row of the table on this page and on each page of this section is generally to the relevant congregation page on JCR-UK (not the community page, unless there was only ever one congregation in the community or the community page includes all congregational details). 

  3. As noted in "Other Remarks" under Birmingham in the Second Part of these Statistical Accounts: "The funds of the Congregation are raised by assessment. The Congregation is governed by baalei batim who annually appoint a President, Treasurer and Committee of 5, of which outgoing Parnas and Gabai are ex officio members." 

  4. As noted in "Other Remarks" under Bristol in the Second Part of these Statistical Accounts: "5 persons are returned as seatholders who only subscribe towards our Synagogue as they reside in places where there are none." 

  5. Reference is to the Bath Old Synagogue Congregation in Corn Street. 

  6. Reference is to the synagogue in Seven Street, Birmingham, in use until 1856, when the congregation moved to Singers Hill. 

  7. Brighton's principal congregation was then in Devonshire Place, the reference to "German and Polish" is unclear. 

  8. Bristol's synagogue was then in the Quaker's Meeting House in a court to the West of Temple Street. 

  9. Bath's Old Jewish Burial Ground, Bradford Road, Coombe Hill, dates from 1812. 

  10. This, presumably, refers to Birmingham's Betholom Row Jewish Burial Ground (between Bath Row and Islington Row), Edgbaston, opened about 1823. 

  11. This refers to Brighton's Florence Place Old Jewish Burial Grounds, Ditchling Road, opened in 1826. 

  12. These refer, respectively, to: (i) the small Great Gardens Cemetery (Temple Cemetery), Rose Street, set aside as a private cemetery in 1911 and generally in use from mid-1800s until 1911; and (ii) Bristol's Barton Road (St Phillips) Cemetery in use from about 1750. 

  13. See under Birmingham in the Second Part of these Statistical Accounts for addional data on the Hebrew National School. 

  14. As noted in "Other Remarks" under Birmingham in the Second Part of these Statistical Accounts: "The Chevra is governed by the subscribers who annually appoint a President, Treasurer, Secretary and Committee of 10 members." 


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Contents Page - Provincial Jewry in Victorian Britain

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