JewishGen Danzig/Gdańsk SIG Resources for Genealogical Research
The following external resources may be of interest to researchers of Danzig Jewish genealogy. Please notify the SIG Coordinator of additional resources. If you have personally used a resource, we would also welcome your comments to be displayed here. The JewishGen Danzig/Gdańsk SIG is not responsible for the content of external websites, nor should the appearance of links here be construed as endorsements by the SIG.

Locations of Records

For vital records, both from the Jewish communities and civil authorities, see our chart.

Online Searchable Records

As records from our indexing projects are made searchable online, links and other details will be provided here. Currently, the following genealogical records associated with Danzig are available online outside of the SIG website:

PlaceTypeDatesCommentsLinks
Mauritiusburial1941‑194513 of the deceased identified with Danzig, surnames FELD, FLATOW, FRIED, FRIEDMANN, HEYMANN, KOHN, KURNIK, LINDENBAUM, MICHELSON, REPINSKY, WARTSKI, WILDORFJOWBR

Finding Other Danzig Researchers

You can search the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) for Danzig surnames being researched by others (to find all surnames being researched from Danzig, search by "Town Is Exactly Gdansk"). If you have not added your surnames to the JGFF, you should do so. You can also search for Danzig surnames (search by both "Danzig" and "Gdansk") at the Family Tree of the Jewish People, and publish your GEDCOM-format family trees there.

Archives

The Archives of the Jewish Community of Danzig: Thousands of files covering the Danzig Jewish Community, its precursor communities of Altschottland, Langfuhr, Mattenbuden, Weinberg, and Danzig in der Breitgasse, and Tiegenhof/Nowy Dwór Gdański, some as far back as 1720, were shipped out of Danzig in 1939 and are now kept at the Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People (CAHJP) in Jerusalem. A very detailed inventory is available online (PDF). Follow the links within the inventory for additional details. Many of the items' descriptions suggest they contain significant genealogical information, but the precise extent of the genealogical content of the Archives is unknown. Included are documents in at least German and Hebrew.

Fundraising is underway for a SIG project to extract genealogical information from this material, which you can read about here and contribute to here.
The CAHJP also contains microfilms of files at the Centrum Judaicum in Berlin (1869-1938), and microfilms, documents, and inventories of files from the Polish State Archives in Gdańsk (source). The genealogical content of this material is unknown.

The Family History Library (FHL) of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS) has microfilmed Danzig Jewish vital records (birth, marriage, death), burial records, burial plot purchase records, an 1814 surname adoption list, and a (possible) citizenship list. Details can be found here and here, and a list of the contents of individual microfilms by clicking on the "View Film Notes" buttons on these pages.

This material is now the subject of a SIG project, which you can read about and volunteer for here. The project description includes a more accurate assessment of the contents of some of the microfilms.
JRI-Poland also describes LDS Danzig microfilms and some birth, marriage, death record holdings of the Polish State Archives in Gdańsk. Additional holdings of the latter — immigration files, Holocaust-era files, Kahal files, police files, tax and occupation lists, and local government files — are also described by the Routes to Roots Foundation (click "Archive Database," then "Search Database," then type "Gdansk" and click the "Search" button), where it is also stated that the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw has Danzig Holocaust-era files and Polish Aliyah Passports to Palestine. For more information about Polish Aliyah Passports, see JRI-Poland's Polish Aliyah Passports project website.

The Routes to Roots Foundation also indicates that the Central Archive for Genealogy (Zentralstelle fuer Genealogie) in Leipzig contains births records from Nowy Dwór Gdański (Tiegenhof) for 1855-1889. These were, apparently, microfilmed by LDS and are available from the FHL — details can be found here (click "View Film Notes" for more).

The Geheimen Staatsarchivs in Berlin-Dahlem has 15 volumes about Jews in the Danzig administrative district during 1812-1920, in Repositur 180, according to Edward R. Brandt and Adalbert Goertz's Genealogical guide to East and West Prussia (Ost- und Westpreussen): records, sources, publications & events. If you know more details about their contents, please contact us.

The Leo Baeck Institute has in its online catalog many items pertaining to Danzig — family trees including people from Danzig or with the surname Danzig, items from the Danzig Jewish Community, items from former Danzigers. We would appreciate information about the genealogical content of this material.

Publications

For a list of books concerning Danzig Jewry, click here.

An English translation of the Gdańsk chapter of Yad Vashem's Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. VI is available online.

"Danzig Jewry: A Short History", by Gershon C. Bacon, is a brief online history. See also the Jewish Encyclopedia entry for an historical overview and a partial list of rabbis.

A small list of Jewish soldiers from Danzig who fought for Germany in World War I can be found here. Scroll down to Die Jüdischen Gefallenen des Deutschen Heeres, der Deutschen Marine und der Deutschen Schutztruppen, then download file S190-213.zip listed below. In this compressed file is the image file 2-0046.tif, which contains the Danzig entries. (Hopefully, we will receive permission to extract this information.)

The Aufbau Indexing Project has made searchable thousands of announcements of births, engagements, marriages, deaths, and other events from the pages of Aufbau. You can find many Danzigers by following the "Search the Database" link and then searching by "German Origin" of Danzig (at the bottom).

Holocaust Documentation

Search the JewishGen Holocaust Database and the Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names at Yad Vashem. Survivors can also be registered in the Registry of Holocaust Survivors at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Directories (Business, Address, etc.)

Business and address directories can also provide useful genealogical information, and several covering Danzig have been digitized and are available online. At genealogyindexer.org you can search and find links to online business directories from 1923, 1925, 1926/1927, 1928, 1929, and 1930. A 1937/1938 address directory is available as an enormous 400 MB PDF file here, and a (less useful) 1942 directory is available here. To complement these directories, there is a list of Danzig street names in both German and Polish.

Photographs

Photographs of Danzig and Danzig Jewish life can be found at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, YIVO Institute's People of A Thousand Towns Online Photo Catalog, and the Simon Wiesenthal Center Multimedia Learning Center. Some of the people appearing in these photographs are identified in the captions.