belarus_sig.jpg (14193 bytes)

Belarus SIG  All Belarus Database  Belarus Static Index  Grodno  Minsk  Mogilev  Vilna  Vitebsk  Belarus Resources  Online newsletter  Shtetls of Belarus  Archival records  Given names database  How to use this website  Current Projects  Membership  How to help  JewishGen-erosity  Contact us

History of Grodno

©Copyright by Ellen Sadove Renck-1999
All Rights Reserved
Permission Granted to Belarus SIG for unlimited use of the material.

Originally in Lithuania/Litwa/Litva/Lita, Grodno guberniya was part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, connected with Poland, and then annexed by Russia. The first mention of Lita occurs in the fifteenth century responsum of Israel Isserlein who refers to "Tobiah" who had returned from Gordita (Grodno) in Lithuania and said, "…It is rare with our people from Germany to go to Lithuania." (Israel Bruna, Responsa, **25, 73)

Grodno, one of the oldest cities in former Lithuania, began as a village founded by a Russian price. The village is first mentioned in the Chronicles of 1128. Lida was founded at the same time as Vilna, about 1320. These cities had no Magdeburg Rights or gilds. However, following the death of Gedimin in 1341, his grandson Witold ascended to the throne. The Jews of Brest received a Charter of Privileges on 1 July 1388. Grodno obtained the same in 1389. These charters represent the earliest documentation of organized Jewish communities in the region.

"The preamble to the charter reads as follows:

"In the name of God, Amen. All deeds of men, when they are not made known by the testimony of witnesses or in writing, pass away and vanish and are forgotten. Therefore, we, Alexander, also called Witold, by the grace of God Grand Duke of Lithuania and ruler of Brest, Dorogicz, Lusk, Vladimir, and other places, made known by this charter to the present and future generations, or to whomever it may concern to know or hear of it, that, after due deliberation with our nobles we have decided to grant to all the Jews living in our domains the rights and liberties mentioned in the following charter." [The Jewish Encyclopedia. NY: Funk and Wagnalls, 1916, Vol. VIII, p. 120.] The charter contains thirty-seven sections concerning all aspects of legal, business, and social relationships between Jews and Christians and proscribed punishments for its violation. This document closely resembles those granted by Casimir the Great and Boleslaw of Kalisz to the Jews of Poland, based on the charters of Henry of Glogau (1251_, King Ottokar of Bohemia (1254-1267), and Frederick II (1244), and the Bishop of Speyer (1084). These charters grant privileges to a Jewish populace largely engaged in money lending. The Grodno Charters of 18 June 1389 and 1408 grant privileges to a community engaged in a variety of occupations including handicrafts and agriculture in the town that was the residence of the ruling Grand Duke. The 1389 document reflects that Jews had lived there for many years, owned land, a synagogue and a cemetery near the Jewish quarter and lived in social and economic parity with Christians. The Jews belonged to the freemen class equal to lesser nobles ["shlyakhta"], boyars, and other free citizens. The starosta (official representatives of the Grand Duke) was called the Jewish Judge and decided all civil and criminal cases between Christians and Jews. Jews had complete autonomy over religious matters. The Jewish communities thrived under this system. Each community had a Jewish elder [title after the sixteenth century] as its head who represented the community in all external relations and in tax matters.

Under the regime of the Jagellons, Jews became tax-farmers. Between 1463 and 1478, Casimir granted to Levin Schalomich certain lands in the vovoidship of Brest together with the peasants living on them. In 1486, Bryansk custom duties were leased to Mordecai Gadjewich and Perka Judinovich, residents of Kiev. In 1487 Brest, Drohycin, Byelsk, and Grodno customs duties were leased to Astashka Hyich, Onotani Ilyich, and Olkan, all Jews from Lutsk. In 1488 some taxes of Grodno were released to Jatzkovich and his sons. In 1489, custom duties of Vladimir, Peremyshl, and Litovishk were leased to the Jews of Brest and Hrubieszow. According to the historian Jaroszewic in "Obraz Litwy", Lithuanian Jews of that time developed the country’s commerce, even with business ventures reaching the Baltic Sea and export trade to Prussia.

When Alexander Jagellon succeeded to the throne, he confirmed the Charter of Privileges. Four Jewish tax-farmers of Brest continued to lease the customs of Brest, Drohoczyn, Grodno, and Byelsk affirmed on 14 October 1494. However, in 1495, Alexander expelled all the Jews from the country either because of personal animosity from Alexander Jagellon or his wife Grand Duchess Helena (daughter of Ivan III of Russia), or due to influences of the Spanish Inquisition, or because of Judaizing heresies. At this time, Jews who converted to Christianity automatically attained noble status. Property of the expelled Jews was allotted to various cronies of the Grand Duke. A nobleman named Semashkowich received the properties abandoned by the Jews of Grodno. On 4 October 1495, the estates of the Enkovich brothers of Brest were given to Alexander’s secretary. On 27 January 1497, the estate Kornitza belonging to the Jew Levon Shalomich was given to the magistrate of Brest-Litovsk. This property distribution continued until mid 1501 when Alexander assumed the throne of Poland. At this time, the Jews were allowed to return to Lithuania and their properties and possessions were to be returned to them. Prince Alexander Juryevich, vice-regent of Vilna and Grodno, was to oversee the restoration of property and settlement of debts owed to them; however, they were required to repurchase their former property, pay for all improvements and mortgages, and equip annually a 1,000 horse cavalry regiment at their own expense.

Sigismund I (1506-1548) improved conditions for Jews. In 1508 when Prince Glinski rebelled, two Jews of Brest, Itzko and Berek, furnished him with information. The leading Jew of the country, Michael Jesofovich excommunicated them publicly, prompting eventually an improved tax collection system that he oversaw for Sigismund as prefect over all Lithuanian Jews [1514]. The communities of Brest and Grodno flourished along with Troki, Pinsk, Ostrog, Lutsk, and Tykotzin. According to new statutes of 1529, the life of a Jew was valued at 100 kop groschen as was that of a nobleman while burghers were only valued at 12 kop groschen. Apparently, the Jewish tax-farmers overstepped their legal authority leading to a Brest Jew named Goshko Kozhchich being fined 20-kop groshen for illegally imprisoning the nobleman Lyshinski. Relationships between Jew and Christian were cordial, with shared participation in dining, athletics, and festivals.

Around 1539 a baptized Jew spread rumors about converts to Judaism harbored in the Jewish community. Sigismund ended the harassment of Jews in 1540 when he declared them free of any suspicion. His wife Bona Sporza settled a quarrel between the Grodno Jewish community and one of its powerful families (Judah-Yudicki) over the appointment of a rabbi named Mordechai [ben Moses Jaffe, rabbi of Cracow?], son-in-law of Judah Bogdanovich. (Another man, Mordechai ben Abraham Jaffee was rabbi of Grodno in 1572. See below)

In 1544, Sigismund II, August became Grand Duke of Lithuania and Polish king in 1548. He treated Jews and Lutherans/Calvinists with liberality. At that time, the rabbi of Brest, Mendel Frank, was called "the king’s officer" while prominent Jews were called "Pany" or sirs. Until 1569 with the union with Lublin, Lithuanian Jews lived on grand ducal lands and enjoyed his protection.

After the mid-1500’s, relationships between the minor nobility and the Jews deteriorated. The prevalence of mixed marriages disturbed the clergy. The shlyakhta resented Jews as middlemen in agricultural dealings, the Jewish exemption from military service, and the wealth/power of the Jewish tax-farmers. Living on the protected lands of the king, Jews avoided some of the conflict with the resentful nobility. However, in 1555, the nobility began to attain more power. A blood libel controversy arose in 1564 but was squelched by Sigismund August in a declaration of 9 August 1564. In 1566, however, the nobility finally attained power. They were allowed to participate in the national legislature and produced the repressive Act of 1566. That act stated: "The Jews shall not wear costly clothing, nor gold chains, nor shall their wives wear gold or silver ornaments. "The Jews shall no have silver mountings on their sabers and daggers; they shall be distinguished by characteristic clothes; they shall wear yellow caps, and their wives kerchiefs of yellow linen, in order that all may be enabled to distinguish Jews from Christians." [p. 126] About twenty years later, however, the nobility withdrew these restrictions.

Stephen Bathori from Transylvania attained the throne about [1570?] via an election and confirmed the privilege. Mordechai Jaffe, author of Lebushim" went to Grodno, built the large synagogue with an ark inscription showing the building was completed in 1578. He was active in the Council of Four Lands and developed methodical study of rabbinical literature.

During the reign of Sigismund III (1587-1632), Saul Judich, representative of the Jews of Brest in 1593 addressed the commercial rivalry between the Jews and the burghers encouraged that decrees of Sigimund III that declared inviolable Jewish autonomy in religious and judicial matters. The illegal assumption of magistrates of Brest over kalah or royal matters was stopped. Saul Judich was a prominent tax-farmer and "servant of the king" who is first mentioned in a decree of 1580 as defending, with other community leaders, the rights of Brest Jews against Christian merchants. He was a favorite of Prince Radziwil, a Calvinist. This same privilege was then extended to the Jews of Vilna in a charter permitting Jews to purchase real estate, engage in trade equally with Christians, to occupy houses belonging to nobility, and to build synagogues. They were exempt from city taxes as tenants of nobility and subject to the king’s vovoidship jurisdiction rather than that of local magistrates. Sigismund also demonstrated negative attitudes toward Jews when he provided for the elevation of Jewish converts to Christianity to noble status, leading to what was called "Jerusalem nobles." That law was repealed in 1768.

As Jesuits gained power in Lithuania, the Jews of Grodno faced increasing restrictions until the reign of Ladislaus IV (1632-1648.) No fan of the Jesuits, he confirmed the Charters of Privileges of the Jews of Lithuania on 11 March and 16 Mar 1633. For all his good intentions, Ladislaus was unable to enforce his will. After 1648, the Cossach uprisings effectively mark the end of Jewish economic security in Lithuania. By May 1676, King John Sobieski received numerous complaints from the Jews of Brest led by their rabbi, Mark Benjaschewitsch who received jurisdiction over criminal cases involving Jews in his community and the power to impose corporal punishment and the death penalty. The Lithuanian Council [Jews were taxed as a single body, pro rata agreements made among their representatives meeting frequently at Brest-Litovsk, Vilna, Pinsk, and Grodno] brought some order to chaotic conditions faced by the Lithuanian Jews. Yet, the kahals were insolvent by mid-1700.

References to the yeshiva at Brest are found in the writings of Solomon Luria (d. 1589), Moses Isserles (d. 1572), and David Gans (d. 1589).

On the December 14, 1795, Slonimskaya Guberniya was formed consisting of eight uezds: Slonimski, Grodnenski, Brestski, Kobrinski, Pruzhanski, Volkovyski, Novogrudski, and Lidszki. In a year, Slonimskaya and Vilanskaya guberniyii were united in one and were given the common name: Litovskaya Guberniya. After this, in five years, Slonimskaya Guberniya was separated again and was named Grodnenskaya Guberniya. The decree about the foundation of a new Guberniya in Lithuania came after the 9th of September, 1801 and was carried out in the course of the next year, 1802.

The Guberniya stayed in such condition for the next forty years. In 1843, to the previous guberniya, Belostokskaya Guberniya was added. This new province was acquired by Russia according to the Tilsit Agreement of 1807 and consisted of four uezd: Belostokski, Sokolski, Belski, and Dragichinski. Belski and Dragichinski were united into one; Lidski uezd became part of Vilenskaya Guberniya. Novogrudski uezd became a part of Minskaya Guberniya. Thus, Grodnenskaya Guberniya consisted of nine uezds: Grodnenski, Sokolski, Belostokski, Belski, Brestki, Kobrinski, Pruzhanski, Slonimski, and Volkovyski.

Grodnenskaya Guberniya covered 704.5 square miles, the "smallest" guberniya, larger only than Russian provinces of Moskovskaya, Tulskaya, Kaluzhkaya, and Yaroslavskaya (if not considering provinces in Poland, Finland, and Ostzeiskaya). Compared to the countries of Western Europe, the guberniya had almost the same territory as Switzerland, larger than Denmark, Belgium, and the Netherlands although it yielded in population. There were 1,842 men per sq. mile in the territory and 37 men in one sq. verst (wiorst). As a result, Grodnenskaya was average among the other Russian gubernii. For example, Podolskaya, Poltavskaya, and Kurskaya gubernii, as well as the provinces of Poland and others, exceeded Grodnenskaya in population density by 1.5 times, Western European countries (France and Austria) by two times, Germany by 2.5 times, Italy by 3 times, and England by 3.5 times.

The Council of Lithuania evolved from the Council of the Four Lands and was the Jewish comunities governing body from 1623 to 1764. Various seventeenth and eighteenth century records exist from the council, with signatures, for community representatives. Grodno towns that were the site of these meetings include: Brisk, Chomsk, Grodno, Krinki, Mezeritch, Mir, Seltz, Zabladova, Zelva. Rabbi Saul Wahl of Brest and Rabbi Abraham Katzenelnbogen of Brest participated in the Council of Lithuania..

 

The Great Lithuanian Principality, Grodno region:

Second half of the 13th century:

1568 - Rech Pospolitaya (Polish Principality and Lithuanian principality united)

1795 - Grodno was in Russian Empire.

1796 - Grodno was the center of Lithuanian Guberniya (Litovskaya Guberniya), Russian Empire.

1801 - Grodno was the center of Grodnenskaya Guberniya, Russian Empire.

September 3, 1915 – Grodno was occupied by German troops

March 25 1918 - Grodno was in the Belorussian National Republic.

1919 - Grodno was in Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic.

April 27, 1919 - Grodno was given to Burzhuaznaya Polsha (Poland).

July 19, 1920 - Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic.

1921 – Grodno was given to Panjska Polsha (Poland)

September 1939 - Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic.

1941 - German occupation

1944 - Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic

1990 - Republic of Belarus

Grodno region: Great Lithuanian Principality (13th to first half of the 14 century.)

The capital was Navagrudak.

Berestya (Brest), Belsk, Braslav, Borisov, Dobrovitsa, Dragichin, Drutsk, Gorognya (Grodno), Kernava, Kletsk, Klutsk, Kobrin, Kovna, Kremenets, Lida, Lumom, Lagoisk, Lutsk, Mensk, Orsha, Polatsk, Pinsk, Raiylj, Slonim, Turov, Upita, Viljkamir, Vilnya, Vitebsk, Volkovysk,

Grodno region: Great Lithuanian Principality (Second half of 14 century and 15 century)

The capital was Vilnya.

Astrog, Beljsk, Berestje (Brest), Bransk, Brest, Broslav, Brotslav, Chechersk, Chernigov, Chernobyl, Cherkasy, Eljnya, Glinsk, Gomel, Gorodnya, Gorodok Davidov, Kanev, Kiev, Kletsk, Kobrin, Korots, Kovna, Krichev, Kremenets, Lida, Lubech, Lutsk, Merach, Mensk, Mogilev, Mozyrj, Novogrudok, Novrogod-Severski, Oshmyana, Pinsk, Putiulj, Polotsk, Puni, Rasiunya, Rechitsa, Roslav, Smolensk. Stislav, Trubchevsk, Propoisk, Ratna, Rogachov, Ryljsk, Slonim, Starodub, Svir, Troki, Turov, Upita, Vilnya, Vilkamir, Vinnitsa, Vitebsk, Volkovysk

The Great Lithuanian Principality was established around Novogorok Province that incorporated vast Belarusian and Lithuanian territories. The establishment of a principality around Novogorodok (presently Novogrudok, Grodno province) enabled the two nations to retain their independence and provide resistance to Mongol-Tatar raids and German expansionist claims. In 1569, the Great Lithuanian Principality and the Kingdom of Poland signed the Lublino Treaty to become a single federal state--Rzeczpospolita. The Great Principality of Lithuania kept its own bodies of state administration, legislation, state language, financial system, and military. The supreme power in the Rzeczpospolita belonged to the Polish landlords. The alliance managed to survive for over two hundred years. As a result of the three partitions, Rzeczpospolita ceased to exist with Belarus territory going to Russia.

Grodno Pavet (region): Rech Pospolitaya (End of 16th century)

Avgustov, Berestovitsa, Berestovitsa, Dubna, Dubnitsa, Garadok, Glyadavitchi, Gorodnya, Glubokae, Indura, Kamenka, Kamenitsa, Kusnitsa, Kvasovka, Lasha, Lipsk, Lososna, Lunna, Malaya, Mosty, Netechi, Novy Dvor, Odelsk, Razhanka, Sakolka, Sapotskin, Schutchin, Skidel, Strubnitsa, Supraslj, Svyatsk, Vasilkov, Volkovysk, Zabludov, Zelva

Grodno region: Rech Pospolita (17th century)

Grodno’s capital was Vilna in the Lithuanian Principality

Braslav, Berestje, Borisov, Cherersk, David Gorodok, Drutsk, Garodnya, Gomel, Kobrin, Krichev, Mensk, Mogilev, Mozyr, Mstislav, Navagaradok, Orsha, Pinsk, Polotsk, Propoisk, Rechitsa, Slonim, Stolin, Turov, Vitebsk, Volkovysk

Grodno Pavet (region) (Second half of the 19th century)

Azery, Berestovitsa, Bershty, Boljshaya, Dubna, Galynka, Gozha, Grodna, Gudevichi, Kamenka, Lunna, Malaya Berestovitsa, Masty, Masalyany, Prakopavichi, Skidel, Vertelishki, Volpa, Zhydomlya

Grodnenskaya Gubernya (Beginning of the 20 century)

Azery, Belystok, Belsk, Brest-Litovski, Dambrova, Derechin, Domachevo, Dragichin, Dyatlovo, Garadets, Ganenz, Grodna, Homsk, Ivatsevichi, Kamenka, Kamenets-Litovski, Kartuz-Beresa, Karytsyn, Knyshin, Kobrin, Kosovo, Lunna, Malarita, Mosty, Motel, Parechej, Peski, Ozernitsa, Pruzhany, Rosj, Rozhanka, Ruzhany, Sakulka, Schutchin, Skidel, Slonim, Suhavolya, Surazh, Trastsyany, Tsehanovets, Vasiljkov, Volovysk, Volpa, Zabludavo, Zeludok

(Navagrudak was in Minskaya Gubernya)

Grodno Uezd and Town page

GRODNO UEZD INFORMATION: and the towns of Bershty, Bershtovskaya, Bogordickaya, Brestov-Velik, Drusgeniki, Dubno, Dubnovskaya, Godevicheskaya, Golynka, Gozhskaya, Gozha, Grodno, Gornica, Gornickaya, Gudevichi, Indura, Indurskaya, Kamenka, Kamenskaya, Krinskaya, Krinki, Lashanskaya, Lunna, Lunnenskaya, Malo-Berestovickaya, M. Berestovica, Masalyany, Mosty, Mostovskaya, Ozerskaya, Ozery, Prokopovich, Skidel, Skidelskaya, Sobolyanskaya, Strupin, Veliko-Berestovickaya, Vel-Kovalichki, Vercelishki, Vercelishskaya, Volpyanskaya, Volya, Zhidomlya, and Zhidomlyanskaya

Religion in 1887/td> Provinicial town of Grodno Grodenski uezd
  men women men women
Orthodox

6721

3192

37743

35089

Catholic

3811

2861

21204

20955

Protestant

142

153

33

32

Jewish

12058

15543

7697

7748

Mohammedan

64

30

117

127

Total

22796

21779

6691

63951

1887 Grodnenski Uezd Population by Social Class

 

Title of the "Estates"

men women
Nobility 1) hereditary

369

392

2) personal

199

205

Clergy 1) Orthodox "White"

56

71

1) Orthodox "Monkish"    
2) Catholic "White"

14

 
2) Catholic "Monkish"

1

 
3)    
4)    
5) Jewish

18

31

6) Moslem

1

1

Urban Estates 1) Citizens (hereditary)

6

3

1) Citizens (personal)

4

4

2) Merchants

30

43

3) Middle-class

11211

11391

4)    
Rural Estates 1) State peasants

14149

13768

2) Settlers    
3) Peasants-proprietors

36455

35630

4) town peasants    
5) Free people    
6)

5

8

Military Estates 1) regular troops

1232

46

2) irregular troops    
3)

1855

1180

4) retired lower ranks

549

574

5) soldiers' children

369

367

Foreign VI. Foreign Subjects

268

237

VII. People who do not belong above    

TOTAL

 

66791

63951

Grodno uezd, Grodno gubernia fairs in 1887

Velikoy-Berestovitze: 9-May, 29-Jun, 6-Dec

Volpy: Ascension Day, 9th week after Easter, 19th week after Easter, 15-Oct, 29-Oct

Grodno town Livestock in 1884:

Horses 911/19,547

Catttle 372/44,885

Sheep, simple: 232/58993

Sheep with thin fleece: 0/14220

Pigs: 948/29033

Goats: 327/983

Donkeys/mules: 4/6

Total livestock in Grodno: 2794

Total livestock in Grodno uezd: 167,667

Buildings in Grodno Town in 1887: stone/wood

Habitations –public: 26/12

church/monastery: 13/5

social: 7/28

private: 390/2157

Public shop: 3/2

Social shop:--

Private shop:

Private store: 26/49

Social store: --115/19

Theater: 271/165

Total: 852/2,437

1887 Grodno Provincial TOWN Population by Social Class

 

Title of the "Estates"

Grodno Provincial Town

  men women
Nobility 1) hereditary

603

711

2) personal

231

397

Clergy 1) Orthodox "White"

8

 
1) Orthodox "Monkish"

10

11

2) Catholic "White"

6

 
2) Catholic "Monkish"

9

13

3)

1

2

4)    
5) Jewish

2

1

6) Moslem    
Urban Estates 1) Citizens (hereditary)

21

33

1) Citizens (personal)    
2) Merchants

108

196

3) Middle-class

13953

18639

4)    
Rural Estates 1) State peasants

73

49

2) Settlers    
3) Peasants-proprietors

16

11

4) town peasants    
5) Free people    
6)    
Military Estates 1) regular troops

6347

247

2) irregular troops    
3)

777

619

4) retired lower ranks

432

581

5) soldiers' children

112

150

Foreign VI. Foreign Subjects

87

119

VII. People who do not belong above    

TOTAL

 

22796

21779

1887 GRODNO town statistics for zashtatnye cities, places, and posady

Name of Settlement

1887 Population

Distance from Gubernia city

Distance from district city

Lat/

Long

Postal Address (P.S)
Brestov.-Velik p

1251

56

56

53

12

42

11

Krinki
Volpa p

2027

57

57

53

22

43

31

Lunna
Volya

665

47

47

53

18

42

26

Lunna
Grodno g.c.

44575

   

53

41

42

40

none
Drusgeniki p

1070

38

38

54

1

42

8

Drusgeniki
Indura

2178

24

24

53

27

42

2

Grodno
Kamenka p

270

46

46

53

33

42

40

Strupin
Krinki p

3695

48

48

53

16

41

55

Krinki
Lunna p

1533

46

46

53

27

42

26

Lunna
Mosty p

693

64

64

53

25

42

48

Lunna
Ozery p.

1904

23

23

53

43

42

20

Ozery
Skidel p

785

29

29

53

35

42

25

Strupin

Grodno uezd: 1887 camps (colony?) and Volosts with postal addresses

(volost=smallest administrative/territorial unit of pre-Revolutionary Tsarist Russia;

Guberniya=Basic administrative/territorial unit of pre-Revolutionary Russia

1 desyatina = 1.0925 hektar; 1 hectar = 10,000 square meters

CAMP

Designa-tion

Name of district camps name of places: camp flats & volosts government Post Address Distance from camp flat Distance from district city Distance from gubernia city
1st   1st camp Grodno District        
1st Volost Gozhskaya village: Gozha city: Grodno

14

14

11

1st Volost Gornickaya village: Gornica city: Grodno

12

12

12

1st Volost Vercelishskaya village: Vercelishki city: Grodno

12

12

12

1st Volost Lashanskaya village: Vel-Kovalichki city: Grodno

24

24

24

2nd   2nd camp place: Krinki place: Krinki  

48

48

2nd Volost Krinskaya place: Krinki place: Krinki  

48

48

2nd Volost Indurskaya village: Prokopovich city: Grodno

22

28

28

2nd Volost Malo-Berestovickaya village: M. Berestovica place: Krinki

10

50

50

2nd Volost Veliko-Berestovickaya village: village: -Berestovica place: Krinki

21

56

56

2nd Volost Golynskaya village: Golynka place: Krinki

16

62

62

3rd   3rd camp place: Lunna place: Lunna  

46

46

3rd Volost Lunnenskaya place: Lunna place: Lunna  

46

46

3rd Volost Bogordickaya village: Masalyany place: Lunna

20

42

42

3rd Volost Godevicheskaya village: Gudevichi place: Lunna

12

42

42

3rd Volost Volpyanskaya place: Skidel Strupin

12

57

57

4th   4th camp place: Skidel Strupin  

28

28

4th Volost Skidelskaya place: Skidel Strupin  

28

28

4th Volost Zhidomlyanskaya village: Zhidomlya Strupin

14

16

16

4th Volost Kamenskaya place: Kamenka Strupin

20

46

46

4th Volost Dubnovskaya village: Dubno place: Lunna

20

48

48

4th Volost Mostovskaya place: Mosty place: Lunna

35

64

64

5th   5th camp place: Ozery

and in summer: place: Drusgeniki

place: Drusgeniki  

38

38

5th Volost Sobolyanskaya place: Drusgeniki place: Drusgeniki

18

38

38

5th Volost Bershtovskaya village: Bershty place: Ozery

22

42

42

5th Volost Ozerskaya place: Ozery place: Ozery

22

23

23

1887 Grodno Uezd Surnames and Occupations

TOWN OCCUPATION SURNAME First Name Pharmacy Number
Grodno lawyer Abramski Lev Osipovich  
Grodno physician Abramski Savati Saveljevich  
Grodno dentist Andres Reihlya Berkovna  
Grodno lawyer Bakinovski Lutsian Semenovich  
Grodno pharmacy owner belonged to the church #1
Grodno physician Benitski Yulian Feliksovich  
Grodno lawyer Bush Oktavian Boleslavovich  
Drusgeniki physician Buyakovski Valerian Ivanovich  
Grodno lawyer Drazdovich Vladislav Frantsevich  
Grodno lawyer Eismont Konstantin Osipovich  
Grodno pharmacy manager Feishner   #3
Grodno physician Gershun Grigori Yakovlevich  
Grodno physician Gozhanski Samuil Lazarevich  
Grodno lawyer Gushkovski Ivan Lvovich  
Lunna physician Gustcha Ivan Osipovich  
Grodno physician Hazanovich Osip Abramovich  
Lunno pharmacy owner Hvenkovski   #7
Grodno physician Iljitski Kaetan Stanislavovich  
Grodno dentist Issaakov Alexei Mikhailivich  
Grodno lawyer Kakoshko Segizmund Mikhailovich  
Grodno lawyer Kalenkevich Ignati Ivanovich  
Grodno physician Kamenski Ferdinand Martinovich  
Grodno pharmacy owner Kandratovich   #2
Grodno dentist Kaufman Veniamin Leizerovich  
Grodno physician Kostyalkovski Osip Ivanovich  
Grodno lawyer Kramarov Salomon Samoilovich  
Grodno lawyer Linke Yulian Ferdinandovich  
Grodno lawyer Nagorski Stanislav Stanislavovich  
Indura pharmacy owner Natana Ionessa #8
Grodno pharmacy owner Nesterovich   #3
Grodno physician Poluto Anton Antonovich  
Grodno physician Ratenshtein Issak Izrailovich  
Grodno lawyer Senenko Andre Andreevich  
Krinki pharmacy owner Tensushe   #6
Grodno physician Tomashevich Vikenti Ivanovich  
Grodno lawyer Vasinevski Richard Ksaverjevich  
Grodno pharmacy owner Vinover   #4
Indura physician Vizgird Stanislav Selvestrovich  
Drusgeniki physician Vyrvich Boleslav Antonovich  
Grodno lawyer Yachinovski Stanislav Stanislavovich  
Grodno lawyer Yanovski Girsh Haimovich  
Grodno lawyer Yanovski Oeofil Iliya  
Grodno physician Zablodski Boleslav Karlovich  
Grodno lawyer Zaitsev Oaddei Vepediktovich  
Grodno physician Zamkovski Geneh Tevelyavich  
Drusgeniki physician Zbozhek Ooma Ivanovich  
Druzgeniki pharmacy owner belonged to the church #5
Ozera pharmacy owner Gustavski-Gustateis #9
Velikaya-Berestovitsa pharmacy owner Kachinski   #11
Skidel pharmacy owner Krauze Bronislav #10
?Grodno pharmacy manager >Ottovich Felitsian #2

Grodno Uezd towns:

Berestovitza (Bolshoya Berestovitsa, Bolshaya Berestovitsa): 5311 2401 <http://www.mapquest.com/cgi-bin/mqfreeconnect?width=500&height=300&level=5&lat=531833&lng=240167>

Also Mala Berestovitza is a few miles north. 1836: Abraham Zvi Hirsh Eisenstadt (1813-1868) was appointed rabbi. 1897 census: Jewish population of 963 (61%). Yosef Rabavich (1870-?) was appointed rabbi here (for Brestovich-Rabotai). Before that, in 1895, he was rabbi of Porozova. Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania) 1538.

GRODNO,

Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania): 1787

EJ article.

Yizkor:

1905 Jewish population: 24,611.

1894 donors for Israel in Hamelitz: Abraham Eliezer Aleksanderovich , Efraim Aleksanderovich , Gedali' Aleksanderovich, Noach Aleksanderovich , Yehuda Asher Aleksanderovich , Yosef Aleksanderovich , Yosef ben Shlomo Aleksanderovich, Shlomo Andres, Yakov Ahron Arkin, Henia Ashrovitz, David Benetson, Eli Benetson, Yehuda Berger, Abraham Aharon Berkovski, Eliezer Borda, Leib Boroditzki, Rafael Boronovski, Shlomo Boshis, Zvi Boyarski, Aba Braverman, Yitzak Leib Brever, Yehuda Butkov, Moshe Chertok, Zav Zvi Chertok, Lipa Choretz, Moshe Davidszohn, Benyamin Diskin, Peshe Feiga Dishkin, Yakov Noty Dombrovski, Betzalel Ebershtein, Yehuda Efron, Israel Ekshtein, Nisan Elkan, Sholomo Epshtein, Yitzak Erman, Peshe Esayez, Benyamin Faktor, Moshe Falkman, Chaim Shimeon Finfer, Tzadok Freiman, David Friedman, Shimeon Friedman, Yosef Friedman, Abraham Garbolski, Shlomo Garbolski, Yehuda Garnitzki, Zvi Mordechai Garnitzki, Abraham Shimon Gazanski, Shmuel Gazanski, Yehosua Gazanski, Yehuda Ginzburg, Moshe Goldshmid, Yitzak Aharon Gorel, Rivka Grin, Leah Grodenski, Eli Grochovski, Dov Handelsman, Moshe Handelsman, Bobe Hinda, Eli Horvitz, Dober Kapoilski, Moshe Leib Kapolski, Yitzak Kapolski, Shakhna Karpovoski, Mordechai Elkhanon Kashevnik, Yehuda Kashevnik, Israel Katz, Cheikhil Kavaikin, Chaim Khelf, Khatzevski, Zalman Kempner, Chaim Mordecai Kimchi, Eli Kimchi, Yitzak Kimchi, Meir Kopelman, Yekutiel Kopelman, Shevakh Kotovski, Asher Kovoski, Tzadok Krepak, Mona Kroizel, Shmuel Kroizel, Yehuda ben Yehoshua Kroizel, Abraham Labenski, Natan Lampert, Zalman Lampert, Yehuda Levin Lampert (sochet), Abraham Lapidus, Gamaliel Lapidus, Yitzchak Lapidus, Yakov Latreiski, Shmuel Shakhna Lazovski, Feivl Lebenski, Gershon Meir Levin, Shabtai Levin, Shmuel Zvi Levin, Zusman Levin, Abraham Zvi Levinsohn, Sheima Levinski, Eli Lipski, Moshe Lubetzki, Reizil Libetzki, Arieh Leib Lipski, Shmuel Lovenski, Yakov Lubetzki, Benyamin Lubich, Doberish Lubich, Israel Lubich, Ruben Yehoshua Lubich, Nachum Lubich, Shemai Lubich, Yakov Lubich, Yosef Lubich, Shebai Luria, Chaim Malchovski, Moshe Meir Malorzoski, Yosef Maramski, Levi Marni, Zvi Mavshevski, Bendet Meizel, David Chenuch Meizel, Yitzak Meizel, Abraham Meltzinski, Zvi Melnitzki, Nachum Mipilov, Yitzak Molochovski, Heshel Movshoveski, Yehoshua Nates, Moshe Zav Neiman, Efraim Neimark, Menachem Neimark, Zundel Opera, Leib Orlovich, Tzadok Paes, Yakov Palish, Chaim Pinkovski, Moshe Pleter, David Porazovski, Chaim Presnski, Shabtai Prusak, Yekhezkel Meir Rakovski, Abraham Rapaport, Tzadok Rozenburg, Baruch Rozenfeld, Chaim Nachman Rozenkrantz (local depty for Israli fund-raising and head of this collection), Shmuel Elizer Shapiro, Meir Shemesh, Ita Shereshevski,Shilem Shereshevski, Meir Aba Shterenshos, Shmuel Sifres, Modechai Ruben Sini, Shraga Feivl Slomianski, Yakov Shlomo Slomser (Sloser?) Hilel Smolnitzki, Sholom Shtein, Abraham Stoliarski, Yitzak Zav Stoliarski, Benyamin Stutzinski, Gedeliah Tankis, Zvi Tarle, Chaim Meir Tarlovski, Tobi' Tarlovski, Gotlib Tarlovski, Zav Tarlovski, Eliezer Dov Traktovitz, Yakov Shlomo Tarlovski, Yakov Trilnik, Betzalel Trop, Shlomo Trop, Yakov Trop, Yosef Trop, Leib Sobol, Michal Uriahson, Chaim Val, Yosef Valdman, Benyamin Veinberg, Kopel Veinshtein, Zav Viboshevitz, Vinaver (Provizar), David Vizanski, David Vovlik, Abraham Yafa, Betzalel Yafa, Duber Yafa, Eliezer Yafa, Leib Yafa, Yakov Yafa, Hilel Iser Yanovski, Benyamin Yeroshevski, Yosef Zalishanski, Shmuel Zakharin, Benyamin Zilberfenig, Natan Naty Ziman, Israel Shakhna's, and possibly others.

Knishin (Knyszyn):

Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania) 7679.

Yizkor: Kehilet Rohatin, 1962 mention.

Birthplace of Rabbi Moshe Ladinski (1863-?), husband of Israel Neiman's daughter.

Krinki (Kriniek, Krynki):

Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania): 7888.

EJ article Krynki.

yizkor: Pinkas Krinki, 1970.

1922 rabbi: Chasidc Rav Chezeki Yosef Mishkovski. Previous rabbi: Zalman Sender Kanaha-Shapiro.

Lunna (Lunavoila, Volia)

Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania): ?4348. 1912 rabbi: Abraham ben Moshe Natan Zakheim (1860-?)

see Piechotka, Maria and Kazimierz. Wooden Synagogues, 1959.

Novogrudok

The first archeological site in Novogrudok dates settlement in the tenth century. In 1227, Duke Isyaslav governed the city. In the second half of the thirteenth century, Novogrudok was capital of the Great Lita (Litva) Duchy. The Grand Duke Mindoig was named the King that year. In 1268, Turck occupied the place. In 1278, the Tatars occupied and destroyed the city. In 1314, Novogrudok saw a huge battle that killed the best knights of the city. The real defense of the city came from the governor Duke Vitaita. In 1323, Novogrudok became the part of Vilno (Litva). In 1415, the Moscow Metropolit the Grand blessed the first Orthodox church; and Duke of Lita Grigory Tzymvlak was crowned. At the end of the fifteenth century, Novogrudok had eight Orthodox churches and two monasteries. Again in 1505, the Tatars burned a huge part of the city. To rebuild the city, the population paid the following taxes in 1551:

Novogrudok - 60 kopecks per person

Gorodok - 51 kopecks per person

Minsk - 50 kopecks per person

Byaretz, Vitebsk, Polatzk - 100 kopecks per person.

On the 26th of June (or July?) 1511, The Old Ghigimont gave the city independent power that was reaffirmed on 22 February 1562 and 13 May 1570 by August Ghigimont. Vazay Ghigimont III introduced the State insignia with the image of an archangel. On 16 October 1584, King Stephan Batory decreed that all people living in Novogrudok were subject to local authority. This Law concerned even the purchasing of houses. From the year 1581 until 1775, parliament meetings took place under the supervision of the Grand Duchy of Lita (Litva). On 5 January 1614, the same king (Stephan) put the management of the streets Kovalskoy, Dubatuiskoy, Bolchitzkoy, and Belitzkoy at middle-class disposal. In 1624, the first Catholic church was opened. From 1654-1660, Russian Army of Tzar Alekcey Mikhailovich guarded Novogrudok.

In the mid seventeenth century, an epidemic of pests (?) occurred [plague?]. The beginning of the eighteenth century brought the new catastrophe to the city: destruction during the North War.

A fire in 1751 completely devastated the city. At the end of the eighteenth century, the population was 3000 people. Political governance:

1795 - part of Russia with the center of Slonim

1797 - part of Lita;

1801 - part of Grodzenskay Gubernyia;

1842 - part of Minsk Gubernyia.

The 1866 population was more than 6,500. The following enterprises opened: four beer producers, two brick factories, one wine producer, and one photography laboratory. At the end of the nineteenth century, the population was 8,000. Governing shifts resulted during World War I:

Spring 1915 - German Army

Winter 1918 - Soviet government

Autumn 1919 - Polish Army

19 June 1920 - Red Army

As a result of Riga Agreement in 1920, Novogrudok became a part of Poland until 1939. In 1939, Novogrudok was part of the Belorussian Republic with a population of 14,000.

Today, Novogrudok is a regional center of Grodzenskoy oblast (region).

ODELSK

The settlement at Odelsk probably existed in the 15th century. The chronicle written and signed on 20 June 1546 by Queen Bona Sfortsa talks of privileges granted to the settlement regarding trade and freedoms by the Knight Kazimir. The 1546 chronicle mentions that the previous document "burned in the Catholic church not long ago". The same document states that the people of the settlement are allowed to hold weekly markets and must pay taxes from the harvest gathered on the land.

Later the rights of the people from the settlement were approved on March

26, 1580 by the King Stephan Batori and Vladislav IV(May 23,1633). The burned Catholic church was rebuilt by the father of Vladislav IV, Zhigimont III Vaz. Up to today, no data found proves that the people were able to use the Maideburg Right. This may explain that the people were not economically strong even though all the other

privileges were approved in 1670.

In the middle of nineteenth century, Odelsk was a mestechko with 163

wooden houses and a population of 905 people. The population mainly engaged in agriculture and lived very poorly resulting in a folk expression of a poor lifestyle: "They live like in Odelsk".

At the end nineteenth century, Odelsk had 282 houses and a population of 1,828.

Among them were five of nobles, four noble trader representatives, eight clergy, 1,479 bourgeois, 186 farmers, and 31 others. The income of the mestechko was 225 rubles and the money spent from the mestechko's budget was 220 rubles. From this amount, the governmental expenditures were 170 rubles. Today, Odelsk is in Grodno Oblast ,Indura povet and is designated as a village.

 

Ozery (Azery, Ozra, Yeziori, Jesiory),

Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania) 209.

EJ article.

see Piechotka, Maria and Kazimierz. Wooden Synagogues, 1959.

1912 rabbi: David Charny (1847-?)

Skidel:

Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania) 6110.

EJ article.

1912 rabbi: Abraham Hirshovitz (1861-?)

Suchovola (Suchowola):

Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania) 5694.

yizkor: Sefer Suchavola, 1957.

1889 rabbi: Abraham Einjorn.

see Piechotka, Maria and Kazimierz. Wooden Synagogues, 1959.

Volp (Wolpa, Volpa)

Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania): 2608

yizkor: Volkavisker Yizkor Buch, 1949.

see Piechotka, Maria and Kazimierz. Wooden Synagogues, 1959.

EJ article.

1887 GRODNO GUBERNIYA TOTALS:

Grodno Uezd and Guberniya Population Totals by Religion in 1887

Religion total in towns total in uezd total in gubernya
  men women men women men women
Orthodox

25321

14607

357204

363677

382525

358284

Catholic

21325

20028

150543

147363

171868

167391

Protestant

1527

1485

4363

4480

5891

5965

Jewish

80738

77606

57677

59962

138415

137568

Mohammedan

865

345

380

405

1245

750

Total

129776

114071

570167

55887

669958

669958

Grodno Guberniya Population by Social Class in 1887:

 

Title of the Estates

Total in towns

Total in Uezd

Total in Guberniya

 

men

women

men

women

men

women

Nobility 1) hereditary

1295

1379

3728

3856

5023

5235

2) personal

746

894

629

672

1375

1566

 

Clergy

1) Orthodox "White"

102

116

935

1922

1037

1138

1) Orthodox "Monkish"

10

11

20

 

30

11

2) Catholic "White"

38

 

67

 

105

 
2) Catholic "Monkish"

9

13

1

 

10

13

3)            
4)

5

6

1

1

6

7

5) Jewish

77

65

124

170

201

235

6) Moslem

4

 

2

3

6

3

Urban Estates 1) Citizens (hereditary)

78

97

66

71

144

168

1) Citizens (personal)

59

52

85

87

144

139

2) Merchants

800

794

317

386

1117

1181

3) Middle-class

95110

99222

79797

82679

174907

181871

4)

6144

5017

801

713

6945

5730

Rural Estates 1) State peasants

678

594

167212

165220

167890

165814

2) Settlers

97

100

3503

3468

3600

3568

3) Peasants-proprietors

168

224

267901

267081

268069

267305

4) town peasants

46

51

   

46

51

5) Free people            
6)    

35

38

35

38

Military Estates 1) regular troops

18044

857

4946

69

22990

926

2) irregular troops

4

1

2

4

6

5

3)

2816

1709

18409

11437

21225

13146

4) retired lower ranks

1793

1593

13036

10127

14829

11720

5) soldiers' children

384

392

5631

6146

6014

6538

Foreign VI. Foreign Subjects

1091

724

2316

2067

3407

2791

VII. People who do not belong above

178

160

603

600

781

760

  TOTAL

129776

114071

540167

55887

699943

669958

Livestock in all Grodno towns and in all Grodno uezds in 1884:

Horses: 4355/150978

Cattle: 6471/482811

Sheep, simple: 3143/527426

Sheep with thin fleece: 111077

Pigs: 6946/326947

Goats: 758/3421

Donkeys/mules: 6/53

Total livestock in towns: 21679

Total livestock in uezds: 1,602,713

Total Grodno Guberniya Livestock in 1884:

Horses: 155333

Cattle: 489282

Sheep, simple: 530569

Sheep with thin fleece: 111077

Pigs: 333893

Goats: 4179

Donkeys/mules: 59

Total livestock: 1,624,392

Buildings in all of Grodno Guberniya in 1887: stone/wood

Habitations –public: 58/47

- church/monastery: 31/79

- social: 29/105

- private: 1,387/17,601

Public shop: 4/12

Social shop: 10/56

Private shop: 39/104

Social store: 122/67

Private store: 1,289/1,010

Theater: 3/2

Total: 2972/19,083

 

 

[Source of names: originally printed in ZichronNote, the Newsletter of the San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society, Volume XIII, Number 2, May 1993, Pages 9-12. Reprinting of material from ZichronNote is permitted provided there is no explicit prohibition and provided that source attribution is made.  The source of the names  was researcher Leon Oransky, who abstracted the information from archival sources in Belarus. Mr Oransky was a correspondent of Jerry Delson who was running a project of the SFBA JGS called "Shtetl Roots" which was an early precursor of the data abstractions currently so popular in the Jewish genealogical community. The list was provided to the SFBA JGS, transliterated from the cyrillic, and published in ZichronNote for public nonprofit use.]

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

JEWS OF GRODNO PROVINCE IN WORLD WAR I

PRELIMINARY INDEX

A list of five hundred first Jewish soldier casualties

The data are excerpted from contemporary official records containing surnames, first names, fathers' names (not always), religion, marital status, place of residence, military rank, date of event, kind of casualty (being killed, wounded or missed in action). In this preliminary index, only surnames are mostly given. In the case of repeating surnames, initials are shown. In some cases almost full principal information is given as illustration of the material to be found in the original source.

Surnames and (almost always) first names are straightforwardly transliterated by Roman characters. Rules of transliteration from Cyrillic alphabet are those of Encyclopedia Judaica ("Keter," Jerusalem, 1972), vol. 1 ... Symbols and conventions:

If the initials are given, a hyphen "-" between capitals denotes double first name.

A "b." before full first name denotes "ben" = son of.

Locality and other additional information are given in brackets (...).

Letter 'm' denotes a married person, lack of "m" unmarried.

Letter "k" denotes killed, lack of "k" otherwise (missed in action or wounded).

Geographical notations:

G=Grodno, G.u.-uyezd (district) of Grodno

B=Byelostok, B.u.=district of Byelostok

BL= Brest-Litovsk, Bl.u=district of BL, and so on

Be=Belsk, K=Kobrin, P=Pruzhany, S=Slonim. So=Sokolka, V=Volkovysk

Lack of town's or shtetl's name after an "u" denotes country locality in that district.

An asterisk (*) denotes a person clearly of Jewish origin but marked (maybe by mistake) as non-Jewish.

Abaretin, Adamovich, Aguinikov, Akshevich, Aleshkovski Yudel (So, m), Alpert Abram b Iser (Be),

Astambovski, Aynshteyn, Ayzinberg, Ayzner

Bakrakh, Balabos, Balgley, Balonkin, Baranovich, Barinbaum Pinchus (B), Barkan, Barlas, Bas Moshe b. Leyb (B.u. Gorodok), Baum K.M., Beker, Belski, Berengolts, Berkov-Gvin, Berman Shmuel b. Moshe , (K.u.), Bernin, Bez, Bezdezhski, Beyzer I., Binetski, Birbrager, Birfus, Blekher, Blyakher D., Bobkes, Bobra, Bodlutski, Bokshteyn, Bolshteyn, Bordon R.Kh. (G.u. Vel. Berest), Borel, Borlinski, Borovik, Bornowski, Borukhi, Bostdin, Boyarski, Brandes Shaya, Bromberg, Bronshteyn L.M. (B.u.), Bushmich, Bushmits,

Chapnik, Chechkovski, Chemerinski, Cherny G, Chernyak, Chertok,

Daybakh,, Daych, Devin, Divenski, Doktorovich, Doliner, Dubovski, Dudovski Yuda b. Shaya , (So.u.Yanov), Dunski, Dzyum

Efron D. Ye. (V.u. Izabelin), Ekkteyn Z.I., Ekshteyn Nokhim, Ellin P, Elhinyuk, Engel, Epelbaum Gillel , u. Drogichin), Epelbaum Moshe b. Aron (BL), Epelbaum Shlomo b. Moshe (BL.u.), Epshteyn Itsko, Epshteyn Borukj b. Abraham (B), Eskin,

Fidman (perhaps Fridman), Fayvuzhinski, Felman Isaac (K.u. Brashevichi), Ferder, Fin-Meer (Be.u.Orla), Finkelshteyn, Fishmin, Fleysher, Fretke, Fribenshteyn Eli (G.u., k.), Fridman (Pr.u.Malech), Fridovich, Fridrovich Oyzer, Froman, Furman Abram-Girsh, Furman Nakjman,

Gabovt, Gayka, Gelbord, Geler, Gelkeybayl Fendikj, Gendler, Ger, German Ayzik, German G-Kh.N., Gershun N., Gertsovski, Ginzburg Ch.Ya (Sl.u.), Ginzburg L.P., Gipershteyn, Girsten, Gizner, Gleyzer G., Glotser, Gobovich Dovid-Alter (G), Godbeter, Goldberg Borukh (K.u.), Goldberg Itsko, Goldberg Shiya, Goldenovski, Goldshteyn N.L., Goldvats, Goloborodko, Goloborski, Gonikman, Gorenshteyn M., Gornitski, Gorset, Gotfrid, Grimberg Z. (B), Grinkovski, Grobinski G, Grobinski M, Grodz, Grodzenski , Grodzenski Simkha-Abr.*, Gurevich Ya.N., Gurkinkel, Gutman Moshe b. Alter (BL), Gutman Leyzer, Gutman M.G.,

Indershteyn, Iosem-Simkhen, Ivenitski Srol b. Berko (S.u. Dyatlovo), Izbornitski,

Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania) A.-M., Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania) E, Kagan and Levin (Yiddish and Hebrew Encyclopedias of Lithuania) Gersh b. Yeshua, Kapan M.S., Kalbkuf, Kalika, Kalina Iuda, Kamenets, Kanyuk, Kaplan Abram (G.u.), Kaplan Berko b. Todres (G.u.), Kaplan Mordukj b. Borukj (S), Kaplan , tali . Abram (v.u.), Kaplinski, Kapulski, Karpatski, Karpovski, Karpukhin M, Kats D. (So.), Kats S.KH , r.u.Malech), Kats Srul (Pr.u. Selets), Kats Srul (BL.u.), Katsenelenbaum I.A., Katsevich, Katsin, Kelman V, Keyler Kalman, Khabotski Osher-Itsko, Kharlap Ya., Khasman, Khazanovich Yu., Khelko Ber b. Leyb, Kehlko Ioseif b. Leyb, Khizunterman, Khomski Yevel b. Meir (S.u. Kossova), Khomski Yevel b. Mikhail ,S.u. Kossova), Khots Ovsey b. Leyb (BL), Khots Kadesh-Itsko b. Meir (G.u.), Krhobolovski, Khvilevitski grsh-Srol b. Abram, Kirzner, Kisel, Kishitski, Klembord, Knyshinski, Kontor A.M. (mayber Kantor), Koller, Kominski, Komoshinski, Koner, Konotopski, Kopchik, Kopp Khaim b. Aron, Korotinski, Kosobski Aron (G), Kossovski Vof b. Sholom (S.u., k. Aug 1914), Koval (P.u. Berezovo), Kozkukhin, Krain, Krakopolski Yudko b. Zelman, Kravchik, Kravshchev, Krinski, Krivoy, Korvshch (may be Kravets), Kruglik, Krupchitski, Krupinski, Kulesh, Kunchitski, Kulesh, Kunchik, Kursi Moshe, Kurts, Kushchik, Kushelevski, Kushker (perhaps Kushner), Kushner D.B., Kutsenelenbaum I.A. (Sc.),

Layn, Lande G., Lzanik M. (So), Leybloko, Len I. Sh., Leynunski, Lev Ekhiel b. Moshe (G.u. Krinki), Lev

Ya.F. (V.u. Peski, k. Nov 1914), Lev Beniamin (V.u. Svisloch), Lev Mordukh b. Naftali, Lev Mendel b. , Mikheil (BL. u.), Ldv [sic-Lev] Shlioma b. Shama, Levenbuk G.V., Levin Berko (G.u. m), Levin Abram b. Berko, Levin Gersh b. Yankel (Gu., m), Levin Khona b. Gersh), Levit Borukh b. Meir (S.u. m), Levit Ari b.

Zelman, Leyzer Yankel, Libes, Lilienshteyn, Limanski, Lirski, Litgran, Livshits Mikhel (G.u.), Lom

Lurie Iosel b. Gillel?, S.u. Rechitsa), Lurie Iosel b. Geshel (P), Lyudvig,

Magaziner, Malakhin, Malamed, Malier, Maltsin , Makovich, Margolish Ya. Sh., Marochnik, Marukhas, Mezur, Melier Leyzer (BL. u.), Mereshinski (S), Merken, Mesel, Metchik, Metlovski, Mikhaylevich Eyzer (Vo.u. Ros), Miklashchevski, Miklaski, Milaker, Milokovski, Minkovich, Miriminski Leyb b. Yankel (S), Mirovski, Mirzan, Miski, Mololed, Morgulis Ya., Morukhi, Mostovski Zelik b. Meir (G.u. m.), Motaley, Movshovich K.I., Mudrikh, Mudry, Muller, Muravski,

Nagdimon, Nayman S., Naymark L., Natygel, Nenchinski, Nemirovski M., Nemkin, Nesvizhski, Notes I-

M-L, Novik Orsha (perhaps Osher) b. Shmuel (G.u. Krinki), Novoselitski,

Obersteyn Khaim (V.u. m.), Okrans, Olsha, Orepan, Orlyanski, Orlyanski Gersh (V., m.), Orzherovski, Osovski Itsko,

Pat, Pekarski, Pelengut, Pereshtey (perhaps Perelshteyn), Peresmyg, Pinski L., Pogoda, Polkatitski, Pomeranets L., Pomerants A, Pomerants Abram b. Berk (?) (P.u.), Posemyanik Aron (G), Poskovatvy, Poskovatvy Moshe (So., m.), Prizant Osher (?) (BL), Purzhanski A., Pruzhanski M.N.,

Rabinovich Itsko b. Moshe (G.u.), Radysh, Raguzinski, Rakhmilevich, Ramm Viktor (B), Razin Shlioma, Razum, Reyzer, Reznik Aron-Daivd b. Abram (Be.u. Semmiatichi), Reznik Gedalia (Be.u. Semiatichi, k. , Aug 1914), Reznik Isaak (G), Rozemblyum Mordukh b. Berko [perhaps Rozenblym], Rozenbaum Shmuel

b. Yankel (Pr. u. Malech), Rozenberg Kh., Rozenblum Zalman (B), Rozenshteyn B.-M, Rozental, Rozentsvayg M, Rubin Noakh (BL), Rubinovich Mikhel b. Abram (G.u.), Rubinovich Simkha b. Meir

(G.u.), Rubinsteyn L.A., Rudavets, Rukhames, Ruzkha, Rubitski, Rybnik Yaneki (P), Rybitski, Rykosinski

Sadovski, Salat, Salman, Salmyan, Sapiro I.B., Sarny, Sarver, Segal Yudel, Segalovich Yankel b. Moshe (G.u.), Shabmay, Shalakhman Yankel-Eli (G), Shchitnik, Shchupak, Shedrovich, Sher Borukh b. Itsko (BL.u.), Sher Itsko-Gersh, Shereshevski (G), Shermakov, Shershevski Abram (G.u.), Sheskin, Sheynberg G, Shengald, Shilovitski, Shimkhovich, Shipyatski, Shlenski Pinkhus b. Smuel (p.u.), Shlepak, Shlokhteris, Shlyapok, Shmaevski, Shmidt Shimon b. Berko (B.u.), Shmidt V.N., Shmuskevich, Shostakovski, Shpektor ,evakd (So.u. Vasilikov), , Spigelman R, Shpiller, Shuba, Shuster Tevel b. Itsko (BL), Shuster M.Kh. (So.u. Koritsyn), Shuster M.K., Sustin, Shut, Shutin, Shvakh, Shvarts Yankel b. Abram (B), Shverts, Shvets N., Shveykhus, Shveyski, Sidranski, Simakhovski, Sirder, Sitovski, Skogorzhevski, Slanak, Smazanovich Khona b. Sholem (Vo), Sokolov Iosif, Sokolov Yankel, Sokomski, Solechnik, Stalmer, Strelits, Sturmak, Suksnik (perhaps Sukenik),

Tabachnik R.I. (B), Tabachnik Volf b. Moshko (B?), Tabachnikov, Talikovski, Tarne, Tener Meir*, Tenmbaum Yudel (perhaps Tenenbaum) K.u. Drogichin, k), Tens, Teper, Treschan, Troshinski Nikolay, Troshinski Itsko (K.u. Drogichin), Tsavevich, Tselevich Rubin (So. u), Tsigutko, Tsofnes, Turovski, Tylis, Tylmon, Tymianker,

Vand, Vayn, Vaynberg Berko (Vu. Ros, m., k. Aug 1914), Vaynitov, Vaynrakh David, Vaynshteyn M.L. (V.u. Svisloch), Vaysman Ya.F., Vayso, Veler, Velier Simkha b. Meir, Verblyud, Verman, Vinitski Aron b. Yakov (G.u. Skidel), Vinitski Abram b. Mordukh (G.u.) ,Vinokur, Vinokurov Moshe b. Berko (S.u.

Molchad), Volchinski, Volf, Volmin Shatskel (B), Volshets, Vorobeychik, Vosk, Vumen Mordko b. Sholem, Vydenok, Vykhodtsevski, Vysotski M.,

Yakomovski, Yalovets, Yasenovski, Yeletski, Yelin Zelik b. Shmuel, Yelin E., Yelski, Yezernitski, Yezerski, Yudelevich Khaim b. Khatskel, Yudkovski Tens (?) (maybe Tankhum),

Zachnik, Zalonts, Zaits, Zakgeym Tevel b. Ioseif (S.u. Ruzhany), Zakharyash, Zakov, Zalsman G.Kh, Zalutski, Zamer, Zarutski, Zegman, Zemelevich, Zemski Ya., Zeyman, Zeyman Motel (V.u. m), Zeysel Mendel (V.u. Ros, k. Aug 1914), Zhemyanski, Zhernitski, Zhuk I. Ya., Zilberblat, Zivik,

Sources used in uezd pages:

Skorowidz Miejscowosci Rzeczypospolitej Polskieh (Lists of villages and towns of

Rechpospolitaya (Poland) 1923

"The Origin of Grodenskaya Guberniya", 1887.

The Jewish Encyclopedia. NY: Funk and Wagnalls, 1916, Vol. VIII, p. 120.

Cohen, Chester G. Shtetl Finder Gazetteer. Bowie Maryland: Heritage Books, Inc.1989.

 

 

Last modified: January 18, 2000
Webmaster: Edward Rosenbaum
© 2000 Belarus SIG