“Hajdusámson” - Encyclopedia of Jewish
Communities in Hungary

47º36'N, 21º46'E

Translation of the “Hajdusámson” chapter from
Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary

Edited by: Theodore Lavi

Published by Yad Vashem

Published in Jerusalem, 1975


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Acknowledgments

Project Coordinator

Francine Shapiro

 

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for permission to put this material on the JewishGen web site.

This is a translation from: Pinkas Hakehillot Hungary: Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Hungary,
Edited by Theodore Lavi, published by Yad Vashem, Jerusalem. Pages 270-271.


This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
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JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wish to refer to the original material for verification.
JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy of statements or alter facts cited.


[Pages 270-271]

Hajdusámson

Translated by Shlomo Sné
Edited by Francine Shapiro

Small town in the Hajdu district, 7 kilometers from Debrecen
Population (1941):7,320
Called Samson by Jews

Jewish Population

Year Number
1735/366
1748252
1840418
1880333
1930268
1941216
194662
194934

Until the Second World War

The first Jews settled in Haidusámson in the first half of the eighteenth century, and their main source of income was bringing merchandise to the Debrecen market. Jews were not permitted to settle there until 1840. Indeed, in 1840, when its gates were opened for Jews, the first Jewish settlers in Debrecen were Jews from Haidusámson. In addition to merchants, Haidusámson Jews included artisans and some farmers. The community organized in the beginning of the second half of the eighteenth century. In 1869 when the Jewish communities in Hungary split, it defined itself Orthodox, and the nearby community of Vamospércs was subject to it. It had a synagogue, mikva, Hevra Kadisha, school, Talmud Torah with a cheder, yeshiva, and Tiferet Bachurim Society.

One famous rabbi in Haidusámson was Itzhak Yakov Blum (died in 1851). Some of his Halachic answers and letters were published in the booklet Beit Yakov, in addition to the book Beit Shearim (Munkács, 1889), that was published by his son, Rabbi Amram Blum. Many of the Jews of Haidusámson lost their incomes in 1938 after the publication of the discrimination laws. The young men were taken for forced labor in 1941. Some of them remained in the state, and others were sent to the Ukraine.

The Holocaust

Right after Passover the Jews of Haidusámson along with the Jews of Vamospércs were transported to a farm- type concentration camp near Debrecen. They stayed there without food, subject to the policemen who molested and tortured them. In the middle of June they were transported to a brick factory near Debrecen where the entire district's Jews were concentrated. On June 24 those arrested, among them Haidusámson's Jews, were divided into two groups. One was sent to Austria and from there arrived in Theresienstadt in March 1945. Most of those in that group survived. The second group, which included most of the Jews of Haidusámson, was taken to Auschwitz. About 30 men and women including Rabbit Gabriel Yehuda Illiovics, who was a local rabbi until the Holocaust, returned to Haidusámson after the war. The rabbi tried to reorganize his community, but the returnees gradually scattered, and the rabbi finally left. Only three Jewish families remained in Haidusámson in 1951.


This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of
fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewish communities.
This material may not be copied, sold or bartered without JewishGen, Inc.'s permission. Rights may be reserved by the copyright holder.


JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wish to refer to the original material for verification.
JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy of statements or alter facts cited.

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