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ViewMate Posting VM 25319

Submitted by Jerry & Diane Zeisler

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Information Picture Question
Category: Translation - German
Approval Date: 12/23/2012 4:38 PM
Family Surname: ZEISLER
Country: USA
Date of Image: March 13, 1885
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This is an article written by my great-grandfather, Rabbi Joseph Zeisler, in March 1885, for the publication Die Deborah, a German language newspaper. I would like to have it translated as best as possible. I have a better/higher resolution copy that I can send if necessary. I have no idea what the article is about. Thanks!

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On  Response 
12/24/2012 3:17 AM Hi! He writes about Dr. Alexander Kohut,his personal stations (in Hungary), his books and his emigration to USA: he gratulates a jewish congregation for the election of RABBI Dr. Kohut.
Anderl
12/29/2012 2:37 PM Dr. Alexander Kohut
A bigraphical outline by [???]

Dr. Alexander Kohut (born 1842 in Felegyhaza, Hungary) obtained his first education at the Israelite General School in Kecskemet. The principal of the school at the time, Mr Heinrich Deutsch, was an excellent grammarian and orientalist, and is now director of the Israelite State Teacher's Seminary and Adjunct Professor at the Rabinical Seminary of Budapest.
Already as a child, Kohut developed an extraordinary preference for Hebrew matters, and Mr Deutsch saw himself obliged to give him private lessons -- free of charge. At twelfe years of age, he read and wrote Hebrew fluently, a fact that attracted the interest of the famous Talmud scholar and local rabbinate assessor Reb Gershon, and Kohut became Gershon's most astute student.
That he did not neglect his secondary school studies is evident from the fact that he was always the first or second of his class.
As a young man, he became devoted to the rabbinical carreer, but given the absence of a rabinical seminary in his home country, he became aware that he would have to pursue his studies in Germany. Thus, after finishing the seventh grade of the Gymnasium [the academic branch of secondary education] - at the time equivalent to the first year of philosophy - he went to Pest, where he was accepted at the german Obergymnasium.
In 1860, he passed the maturity exam, the only one among more than 50 classmates to obtain the grade "Eximio modo maturus", and, on the advise of his previous teacher Deutsch -- who now was teaching in Pest -- he decided to travel to Breslau. He started his journey with very little cash in his pockets, and on the way, he fell ill and had to stay for a few days in a little town, where he spent all his money.
When he arrived in Breslau, he called on the seminary director Dr. Zacharias Frankel, who was delighted with the exegetical knowledge of the young man and accepted him immediately into the advanced curriculum.
Who does not know, how many deprivations, how much hardship and hunger await a talmud student who cannot expect anything from his parents, whose miserable life depends on "giving private lessons", which are so difficult to procure for a stranger? Struggling with unspeakable poverty, he pursued his studies with a diligence that became legendary within his class, and as early as 1865, he passed his doctoral exam "Ex Orientalibus" with brilliant success.
Overwhelmed by the sorrows about sustaining himself and by his diligence, he sped home to Kecskemet to get some short respite near his loving, yet poor parents.
To be continued. I cannot read the rest because the scan is not good enough, especially at the top of the page.

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